Judge John Hodgman Episode 43: Triple Word Scorn

| 3 comments

Jesse and Jessica are used to squaring off against one another when they play online word games on their smartphones. In this episode of Judge John Hodgman their rivalry spills into the courtroom as they litigate their literary license. Please use JUSTICE in a sentence!

A few months ago, Jessica made a last ditch effort to play her turn and plugged in a few letters. Surprisingly, the game accepted and points were awarded.

Jesse felt that without full knowledge of the word's spelling or its meaning, simply plugging in letters at random is "spamming" and therefore cheating.

Jessica ascertains that any word accepted by the game and not ill-gotten through outside help is perfectly legal and that "letter crunching" is just a way to play in the brave new world of on-line gaming.

Who's playing fair game, who's making it up and where CAN I play this Q? Only one man can decide, Justice of the Game-Piece, Judge John Hodgman.

STREAM OR DOWNLOAD THIS PODCAST
SUBSCRIBE TO THIS PODCAST in ITUNES or the RSS FEED
VIEW THE EVIDENCE

EVIDENCE

One screenshot of her defending a choice in her game with Jesse (her username is Born2BeMild)

One screenshot of another recent game from Jesse with his mother, holding her to the same standards of knowing the definition to each word (his username is Tenthrow)

Embeddable Audio Player Code (Copy and Paste)

Comments

A little Paul and Stormism

Spam the Engine is the name of my Rage Against the Machine cover band.

Aside on irony - not long

Aside on irony - not long after listening to this episode, I listened to an entire edition of NPR's "On Point with Tom Ashbrook" (which I recommend highly) about irony. I found 'irony' even more confusing after this program than I did before. I think we should just kill the word entirely.

http://onpoint.wbur.org/2011/12/05/a-case-for-irony

Lottery winner's ironic demise

The death of the 98-year-old man who won the lottery in the Alanis Morissette song can be considered ironic. We might ascribe the following thought to the old man once he discovered he won the lottery: "Oh my God! I won $50 million! Now my life is going to be great! No more eating at Perkins for me!" As it turned out, he died the next day and was unable to enjoy his winnings. His luck hadn't actually improved. That's irony.