The Blog of Young America

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Rock & ROFL Pics

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Brooklyn Vegan has posted some awesome pics of the BV & KK Present Rock & ROFL show that we sponsored last night at Piano's in NYC. Looks like it was awesome!

The surprise guest was John Vanderslice, who was a guest on TSOYA in 2006. What an awesome guy.

Above is a shot of our man Will Franken, who's repping Kansas and the Bay in Queens these days. You can find more awesome photos of Vanderslice, the comedy cats and Takka Takka by Ryan Muir over at BV.

And if you missed this show, be sure not to miss our next TSOYA Presents show, Variety SHAC at the UCBT Thursday night... not to mention Will Franken at the Purple Onion in SF on Friday and Saturday.

Ashkon "Hot Tubbin'" now available in iTunes!

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Our man Ashkeezy is the first music star ever born on JJGo, so we're very excited here at MaxFun HQ about the launch of his latest single in iTunes Plus. Not only can you cop the faux-R&B classic "Hot Tubbin," you can also get "The Bay," which features Boots Riley of the Coup and Mistah FAB. I just bought a copy of the double single for myself and gifted a copy to my brother. Do the same! Spread the word! Ashkeezy is it!

Here are some free downloads, as well... his live performance on this week's JJGO:

Ashkon - Hey Keezy

Ashkon - Soldier Boy

New Bunny Day!

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Mimi Cuttest Bunny Ever!
Originally uploaded by HIADA

In my house, the first of the month is New Bunny Day. NBD is the day when my fiancee Theresa and I turn the page of our bunny calendar, revealing a new bunny each month.

This funny lady isn't the bunny we'll reveal later on when Theresa gets home from school, but this is one fucking great bun.

Happy new bunny day everybody!

Armando Ianucci and Steve Coogan on The South Bank Show

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The South Bank Show is a long-running British arts & culture magazine show, from what I understand. Below, two of the kings of UK comedy, Armando Ianucci and Steve Coogan, discuss their craft. If you're not already familiar with their work, try seeking out "The Day Today" on the video sites.

Above, Cougan, below, Ianucci.

Podcast: Comedy by the Numbers with Dr. Gary Rudoren and Prof. Eric Hoffman

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Show: 
Bullseye

Prof. Eric Hoffman and Dr. Gary Rudoren are two of the world's foremost researchers in the field of humor. Their new book, "Comedy By the Numbers" contains "The 169 secrets of humor and popularity." They promise that you don't need to be funny to be funny -- just memorize their system, and you'll quickly be impressing the cool kids.

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If you enjoyed this show, try these ones:
Patton Oswalt
Bob Odenkirk
Zach Galifianakis

Interview: Emily Horne & Joey Comeau of “A Softer World” by Aaron Matthews

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Emily Horne is a Victoria, B.C. based photographer and Joey Comeau is a Toronto, ON based writer. Together they create the critically acclaimed webcomic “A Softer World”. In 2007, the comic won the first Web Cartoonist's Choice Award for photographic webcomic and Loose Teeth Press published “It's Too Late to Say I'm Sorry”, a collection of Comeau’s short stories. “A Softer World” celebrated its 5th anniversary earlier this year. I talked to Emily and Joey via email about the process of creating a strip and the strange power of cover letters, among other things.

Where did the idea for "A Softer World" come from?

Emily: Joey started making photocopied comics in 2001 using his own captions and
photos cut out from magazines about the British royalty. When the possibilities of that had run out, he decided photos might work, and I, being inclined to photography, had a good stash of them ready to go. We would take an old manual Smith-Corona typewriter and a stack of photos to the all night Kinko's in Halifax and make comics for the local 'zine fairs. We made two print editions and then decided in 2003 to put them online so more of our friends could see them. These comics make up the first couple of dozen that are currently on the website.

What's the process for creating a comic? How do you and Joey work on the
comic together?

EH: The process for creating the comic is very now different than it used to be. I live in B.C. and Joey lives in Toronto, so the process isn't as immediately collaborative as it used to be. Usually I will put together the visual elements of several comics, cut and paste as necessary, and send them to Joey every few weeks. That way he has a backlog of comics to caption. Usually he runs the text by me before they go up, either by email or via MSN.

Why do you think ASW's format is effective?

Joey: The format's good on a few practical levels. Having the photos illustrate the text directly would have been a nightmare for us, I think. We could have people acting out the scenes but we'd be limited in the kinds of stories we could tell. Zombies? Exploding stars? All impossible. So we chose a format where Emily and I try and find the same tone for the words and images, or different tones that work well and compliment one another.
For the text, having it be so short means that I have to work to fit everything into that one sentence or two. It makes the impact stronger. It's a lot of information at once sometimes, and that's great. I like writing for constrained space. I have to work harder to make everything work, but I think it comes off with more of a punch.

Joey, explain the concept of Overqualified for the uninitiated. Why is the cover letter the perfect medium for this strange combination of despair and hope?

JC: I've written so many regular cover letters while applying for jobs.
They're frustrating and useless and they are just lies, beginning to end. You are saying what they want to hear. These letters don't have anything to do with you as a person or with your hopes for the future, your dreams. Nobody reads these anyway. You could write the craziest things and nobody would ever read them.

So I did. I started writing batshit crazy cover letters and sending them out. At first they were just jokes and frustrations, but hopes and dreams started sneaking into them.
In December I signed a book deal with a publisher here in Toronto to release a novel based on Overqualified. It's going to come out in [Spring] 2009, and it is told entirely through the cover letters. It's probably the craziest thing I've written, and I am super excited about it.

Are there any common thematic threads joining your writing, between A Softer World, Overqualified, and your fiction?
JC: I got an email a little while ago from someone who attended a book club where they were reading my short story book. He said they liked it, but they were all pretty sure that I was a paranoid weirdo. A lot of the stories are about obsessions and people who do things without really knowing why, just knowing that they have to do them. But I think that most of my writing is optimistic in a weird way, too. Anyway, I feel optimistic about it. There's a lot of sex in my writing, too. I don't know about themes. There are a lot of zombies and dead moms and lesbians. That's sort of a running joke between Emily and I, but it never stops being true. There are a lot of zombies and lesbians and dead moms. One day I'll write a story about a zombie lesbian mom.

What’s the usual reaction to the strips? Sometimes when I read ASW, I don't know whether to laugh or cry.
EH: Sometimes I feel like it's unfortunate that ASW is called a comic, because it means people go into the experience of reading it with the notion that it’s always going to be funny and end up disappointed. Even those that are overtly hilarious usually manage to make you feel a bit guilty about your laughter. It's a complicated world out there. Few things are black-and-white, funny-or-not-funny, and ASW reflects that. Reactions to the comic run the gamut from delight and recognition to (occasionally) vehement hatred, and while the angry reactions are hard to take, we do stand by what we've created.

Read a longer version of this interview at Aaron's blog here.

Podcast: The College Years: Fantasies

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The College Years is a look deep into the vaults of The Sound of Young America. Take a journey with us every week as we post a new program or two from our salad days.

Comedian team the Sklar Brothers join Jesse, Jordan, and Maya Baldwin on this edition of The College Years. Also in the episode: gossip about Larry King.

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Podcast: The College Years: Winners Win Big

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The College Years is a look deep into the vaults of The Sound of Young America. Take a journey with us every week as we post a new program or two from our salad days.

Richard Montoya of Culture Clash guests on this episode of The College Years, hosted by Jesse and Jordan. Also in the episode: giving away a lot of tickets.

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Podcast: The College Years: All the World's a Stage

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The College Years is a look deep into the vaults of The Sound of Young America. Take a journey with us every week as we post a new program or two from our salad days.

Theremin player Joseph Minicello joings Jesse and Jordan for this week's action-packed show. In this show: Jordan's little sister calls seeking advice, "Mace Detective, Private Detective" episode "Ain't No Sunshine When She's Gone," Running The Numbers, Myths and facts about homosexuals, and "Would You Rather?"

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"Into the boingle bucket!"

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Is there anything not awesome about this commercial for an early-70s Rube Goldberg machine toy?

Thank you BoingBoing.

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