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Joell Ortiz f. The Kickdrums "How to Change"

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It took me a while to figure out what was special about Joell Ortiz.

He's got heart.

Elephant Larry on Attack of the Show

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Our pals from Elephant Larry and our pal Kevin "Sprinkles" Pereira join force like Voltron for a segment called "Kings of Dot Comedy" on Attack of the Show.

Ep. 104: Hello Baby

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Guests: 
Scott Aukerman

Guest Scott Aukerman joins Jesse and Jordan to talk about things that are ruined by fans of those things, and more.

Download This Episode (MP3 Link)
Discuss the episode on the forum
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ACTION ITEMS:
* Tell us about things that are ruined by their fans.
* Come up with a codeword for MaxFunsters to say to each other.

CONTINUING ACTION ITEMS:

* Do you have a dispute Judge John Hodgman can solve on a future broadcast? Email it to us! Put Judge John in the subject line.
* Need advice? ASK JUANITA!
* Share your Momentous Occasions and Moments of Shame!

Call 206-984-4FUN to share your thoughts on these ACTION ITEMS.

Our theme music: "Love You" by The Free Design, courtesy of The Free Design and Light in the Attic Records

Bill Withers, Soul Legend: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Bill Withers

Bill Withers is the singer-songwriter behind soul classics like Ain't No Sunshine, Lean on Me, Use Me, Just the Two of Us, Lovely Day and more. Withers retired from the music industry in the mid 1980s, and with the exception of a few songs penned for other artists, has stayed out of the public eye. He's featured in the new documentary and concert film Soul Power, which follows a music festival in Zaire in 1974. The film hits theaters in New York and LA on July 14th, and opens across the country thereafter.

TSOYA Classics: Observations (September 15th, 2006)

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We continue our journey into The Sound of Young America's vast audio archive with this program from The Sound of Young America Classics.

Guests Merrill Markoe and Caleb Crain. Merrill Markoe is the author of the novel "Walking in Circles Before Lying Down," and was co-creator of "Late Night with David Letterman." Caleb Crain writes for the New Yorker; we speak with him about the Mass Observation movement of the 1930s and 40s.



Listen to This Week's Show

Download This Week's Show (mp3)
Subscribe to TSOYA Classic: iTunes / Feed

In the Loop - "Tucker's Law"

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(The above isn't even a tiny bit safe for work.)

One of the subjects that came up when the creator of the Canadian sitcom Trailer Park Boys was on The Sound of Young America was creative swearing.

I'm prepping for an interview with the British comedy writer and director Armando Iannucci, and have been thinking a lot about his new film, "In the Loop," which opens in the States in about two weeks and is fantastically hilarious.

It's an ensemble film, but its central character is a political flak named Malcolm Tucker, played by Peter Capaldi. Tucker's streams of profanity are so astonishing that they're almost magical. As much as I love Ricky and Julian's swearing on Trailer Park Boys, Malcolm Tucker takes the cake.

Above, a classic example from The Thick of It, the TV show that begat the film: "Tucker's Law." Very, very NSFW.

Podthoughts by Colin Marshall: "Low Budget FM"

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At one time, Marc Chambers and Tod Perry rode high on their decentish time slots on the talk stations 103.7 FREE FM in San Diego and then 97.1, also FREE FM, in Los Angeles. Though their young show reportedly managed to attain a reasonable status of belovedness, their station nonetheless gave 'em the ax when These Economic Times rendered the FM talk format financially untenable. Fortunately for us podcast-listeners, this FM Talkpocalypse, if you will, has given up and continues to give up a cornucopia of new internet-only shows helmed by displaced "real" broadcasters. Adam Carolla's mind-blowingly successful venture has been discussed in this space before, and Chambers and Perry, also L.A. guys, have followed suit with Low Budget FM [iTunes link].

Since both co-hosts sound and appear to be two twenty/thirtysomething guys who bullshit about culture, the show would initially seem to be yet another entry into the fabulously glutty podcast genre of the TTWGBAC. But be apprised that they record in a "barn" (as they call it), not a basement! And said barn is located in L.A.'s Koreatown, a subregion that also happens to be the home of the Maximum Fun Home Office. Given their background in no-it-actually-goes-out-over-the-air radio, they go a bit heavier on the drops, the bits, the music and the general "liveness" than do podcasters qua podcasters; like regular radio bits, drops, etc., these strategies sometimes prove hilarious, and sometimes prove, well, chuckleworthy enough. Some of the productions verge on theater of the mind, as when the show lapses into faux commercials and elaborate Tom Leykis parodies. It seems, though, that their material is more effective when they go simpler.

Just chattin' 'bout stuff, for example; that's pretty darn simple, and they pull it off with vim, brio and several other dusty, disused adjective-y nouns. Stimulating topics of late have been based upon such various vagaries of a dude's life as what do to when you see some dude in your ex-girlfriends's Facebook profile image [MP3] whether or not to share money with your ladyfriend [MP3], how best to take to international waters when you're basically done with society [MP3], and whether it's worth flying to Denver just for a shot at some chaunch [MP3]. "Chaunch," by the by, is the hosts' recently-invented term for the ladyparts; journalistic responsibility demands that your Podthinker report that he found their repeated usage of the word — and specifically that — more hilarious than most of what he's been hearing anywhere in the last few months.

It's also worth nothing that these guys are putting out this stuff on (pretty much) a daily basis, which is perhaps no great shakes in the remains of the commercial radio industry but which still comes off as a yeoman's job in podcasting. And they also change it up by bringing in buddies, guests, and buddy-guests, the most entertaining of whom happens to be the I.P.A.-loving Mike Cioffi, also known as one of Adam Carolla's tech guys. And, though this isn't really apropos to a podcast column, they actually do the show live as well; you can listen as they stream on ErrorFM. They also talk quite often about doing something on a site called "Stickam", on which your Podthinker might elaborate if he knew what Stickam was. This all adds up to position Low Budget FM as something of a bridge between talk radio and podcasting — a comedic bridge, that is. All bridges should be this funny. Or at least somehow involve chaunch.

Vital stats:
Format: comedy/TTWGBAC hybrid
Running since: October 28
Duration: 4m-50m
Frequency: near-daily
Archive available on iTunes: all

[Podthoughts questions, comments, ideas, suggestions, threats? Contact Podthinker Colin Marshall at colinjmarshall at gmail.]

Paul & Storm: Nunfight; Comedy from The Sound of Young America

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Paul & Storm: Back in the Habit
Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Paul & Storm

Cultural commentators in song Paul & Storm offer a unique perspective on a unique news story.

The Awesome Foundation: Starting.......... NOW!

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The Awesome Foundation is a new philanthropic organization seeking to promote awesomeness.

They define awesomeness thusly:
"Awesomeness is more the product of a creator’s passion than the prospect of audience or profit. Awesome creations are novel and non-obvious, evoking surprise and delight. Invariably, something about them perfectly reflects the essence of the medium, moment, or method of creation. Awesomeness challenges and inspires."

And they're giving away a thousand dollars a month, no strings attached, MacArthur-grant-style, to support awesome projects. Your only responsibility, should you receive a grant, is to report back on what you did and how it went.

I know someone involved in the foundation, and can vouch for its actualness and legitimacy.

So start applying now!

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