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Belfast Meetup

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Date: 
11/08/2011 - 20:00 - 22:00
Show: 
City: 
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Venue Name: 
Muriels Cafe Bar

Come join Jesse Thorn and meet fellow Maxfunsters at Muriels Cafe Bar in Belfast, Northern Ireland. If you think you may be hungry, try and get there a bit before 20:00 to give the kitchen plenty of time. Jesse will be in Belfast to compere the Build Conference. You should check that out too!

Finally: Someone is Taking On the 99%

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Finally, someone is brave enough to take on the 99%, and it is our own Deranged Millionaire, Mr. John Hodgman.

Stop Podcasting Yourself 189 - Charlie Demers

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Guests: 
Charlie Demers

Comedian and writer Charlie Demers returns to talk parodies, fast food, and the worst wrestling gimmicks.

Download episode 189 here. (right-click)

Brought to you by:

(click here for the full list of sponsors)

Jordan, Jesse, GO! Episode 198: The Nightmare Pillow with Kulap Vilaysack

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Childrens Hospital star and Co-Host of Who Charted?, Kulap Vilaysack joins Jordan & Jesse to talk about barber shop super groups, superficial world travelers and awesomely strange gifts.

*Action Item*

Don't forget to call in with your favorite bits, clips, moments and what-not of past JJGO episodes to be used in the 200th episode celebration.

Clips can be anywhere from 2-3 minutes on the short end and up to 10-15 minutes on the longer side.

Please give the episode number and the time in episode your clip plays. (as specific as possible please)

Kate Beaton, Author of Hark! A Vagrant: Interview on The Sound Of Young America

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Beaton's self portrait.
Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Kate Beaton

Kate Beaton joins us on The Sound Of Young America to talk about her webcomic, Hark! a Vagrant. Her comic mines everything from Nancy Drew to obscure Canadian explorers for inspiration. Political figures and literary characters are re-imagined and skewered as petulant children, jaded superheroes and Victorian dude-watchers, accented by a very expressive drawing style.

We talk about building an audience online, Kate's own favorite comics and what gives her inspiration.

Her comics have recently been collected into a book, also called Hark! A Vagrant.

Skyzoo - Written in the Drums

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The World Class Wreckin Cru - Surgery

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"I'm Dr. Dre, gorgeous hunk of a man / Doing tricks in the mix that no others can."

I once wrote a Prank the Dean sketch where the premise was that a guy out on a date had hired DJ Clue to do drops in his date. There was a World Class Wreckin Cru joke in there, and Jordan and Jim looked at me like I was insane when I pitched it.

My Brother, My Brother and Me 78: Fly Me to Heaven, Kid Vid

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It's our super special Halloween Spooktacular, and you know what that means: We quickly forget that it's Halloween, and start going off on tangents about high school boners and how cool Randy Jackson's eyewear is. Pretty spooky, right?

Suggested talking points: Dogg Pound, Hearse, Ingratia, Clownfish, The Fight Club Heist, Engorged, Cat-calling, Moving Like Jagger, The King of Dead

Additional "Bleh!" in Pop Culture

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Sometimes, folks go above and beyond what is asked of them. Listener Jamie McCormick, in addition to submitting her theories as to when the first Dracula spoke the first "Bleh!", also generously provided a list of more recent cultural references to that odd vampire parody sound. This was a tremendously kind gesture given that it will (probably) have no impact on whether she wins the coveted prize.

McCormick noted that "Bleh!" was chanted repeatedly by a vampire character in the "Pink Plasma" episode of "The Pink Panther" (episode 78, from 1975); spouted by Count Drakeula in the "Ducky Horror Picture Show" episode of Duck Tales (episode 32 from 1988); and uttered nearly continuously by Count Blah, a friend of Greg the Bunny.

I’ve included all of them here to bring some animated levity to your otherwise-predictably-gory Halloween viewing.


"Blehs!" start around 3:16.



First “bleh!” around 4:17.


Editor's note: Language NSFW, despite featuring a bunny.

On a related cartoon note, Anna Brawley wrote in to say that she thought there was an old Bugs Bunny short with the same plot as “Pink Plasma” that was made in the 1940s; but I think she is referring to “Transylvania 6-5000” which does feature Bugs getting chased by Dracula, but which was actually made in 1963. It isn’t the winner, and it isn’t big on “bleh!”, but you should absolutely watch it anyway. It’s truly a classic.

On the History and Origin of Dracula's Use of the Bizarre Expletive "Bleh!"

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On this week’s episode of Judge John Hodgman, His Honor set a task for devoted listeners. As your Halloween homework, he asked you to research the origin of Dracula’s use of the term “Bleh!”

Since you are a wonderful, loyal and intellectually curious audience, many listeners wrote in promoting a variety of interesting theories. The first, and likely the most commonly held, suggests that the "word" slowly seeped into our lexicon whilst we absorbed countless indistinguishable impressions of legendary Dracula performer Bela Lugosi. Nathaniel Reha promoted this theory, lifting a quote from the Straight Dope boards: “Actually, thinking about it a sec, I’m hearing a hundred-odd bad impersonations of Bela Lugosi in my head, doing the “I vant to suck your blood!” line. Blood, in the bad accent, becomes ‘bluh’ (with a shortened, almost silent, d or t sound at the end of the word), which just becomes the one readily identifiable word when you think of someone’s bad Hungarian/Transylvanian vampire-speak.” Though listener John McGlothlin notes “[I]f your letter-writer-inner was convinced that ‘bluh’ did not originate in strict canon, that would rule out it stemming directly from Lugosi’s accent in the 1930’s Dracula film.”

Which leads to our second theory. Several listeners suggested that the phrase first appeared in a 1952 Bela Lugosi film called "My Son the Vampire". Jamie McCormick wrote: “The earliest occurrence I can find of a Dracula character making the sound is from 'My Son, The Vampire', a 1953 musical satire starring Lugosi in essence mocking the franchise he himself created. Nosferatu, in company with the other early silent Dracula films, makes no reference to the sound, nor does Lugosi make the sound in his early and serious-minded Dracula films. Note especially the last line of the film's title track – “He wants Bluuuuuuuuuuud!”

Jamie also provided links to the film for those who want to verify this theory. You can find the full film on You Tube or on Netflix; but Jamie also astutely notes that only the Netflix version has the song "My Son, the Vampire" rolling over the credits. Why?

I did some further research. Actually, that title song provides a rather interesting clue. As listener John McGlothlin noted, “[A]round . . . 1964, Allan Sherman put out a comedy song titled “My Son, the Vampire” which opens with “blood!” being screamed in a strange way that sounds rather ‘bluh’ like.” This Allan Sherman tune is the title song of the movie in some (but not all) versions of the film. According to IMDB , the film's original title was “Vampire Over London”, (this is the version available on You Tube), but it was apparently retitled "My Son, the Vampire" for its 1963 American re-release (six years after Bela Lugosi's death) to cash in on the success of Allan Sherman's album, "My Son, the Folksinger". Indeed, there is an American trailer for the film that prominently features Mr. Sherman:

I also discovered that Rhino released an EP of Sherman’s work in 2005 that includes “My Son, The Vampire”. So for 99 cents you can nab the song from itunes and consider the audio evidence yourself. (Although, truthfully, you hear him utter the critical word during the few seconds of the song's free preview).

A third theory, promoted by multiple listeners, claims that the sound was first uttered by comedian Gabe Dell. Kevin Harris first advanced this theory without any video or audio evidence; but listener Cayman Unterborn did all of the heavy lifting for him by providing an extensive defense of Dell as the source of the original parody. First, he provided this explanation from Svenghoolie (who he identifies as a venerable Chicago Horror Icon): “. . . Bela, as Dracula, never said ‘Bleh!’ It was indeed an imitator – back in the days of the old Steve Allen TV show; one of his stock players, Gabriel Dell (who had, at one time, been a ‘Dead End Kid’ in movies – and may have even worked with Bela in a cut-rate Monogram movie) was playing Dracula – and did the ‘bleh!’ thing (or, do you spell it ‘blah!’) From there on, it was history. So many Drac and/or Bela impersonators have done that now that most people assume that Bela actually did that . . .” Unterborn also found a CD that appears to feature a 1963 recording of Gabriel Dell doing his Dracula character (not on the Steve Allen show) and he also points out that you can download audio of the relevant Steve Allen Show episodes where Dell performs as Dracula, but it's going to cost. In terms of putting these performances on the correct spot in our "bleh!" timeline, I discovered that, according to IMDB, Dell performed this character on Steve Allen's Plymouth Show in 1957 (episode 2.35) and again in 1959 (episode 5.3). So that puts it after the original release of "Vampire Over London", but before the re-release of that film with the Allan Sherman title song.

Finally, two listeners suggested a connection to comedian Lenny Bruce. John McGlothin (who, along with Adam Pracht, tried to maximize his chances of winning by providing support for three of these theories) notes that “[I]n the 1960s, Lenny Bruce did a parody of Dracula as a Yiddish man, and the Eastern European accent may have made blood sound a bit like “bluh.” But McGlothin did not provide links to any video or audio which verifies Bruce’s performance or its place in this timeline. This theory does, however, have the backing of reference librarian Emily Menchal who states that there is support for the Lenny Bruce theory in David Skal’s book The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror.

That concludes my dutiful summary of the wonderful answers you uncovered.

So who's right? Only one man can judge the true winner of this contest! And we await his verdict.

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