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Culture: Noz's Rap Picks on The Sound of Young America, August 2011

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Noz

Andrew Noz of Cocaine Blunts is back with us in August to tell us about his favorite tracks of the moment. Check out songs from Mellowhype, Curren$y and others.

Mellowhype - "64"

Pete Rock & Smif and Wesson - "Roses"

Curren$y & Fiend - "Televised"

Short Kid f/ Chetta - “Ima Vulcha”

And two more tracks that were cut from broadcast:

Freestyle Fellowship - "Welcome"

Waka Flocka Flame -" Stereo Type"

Alumni Newsletter: August 9, 2011

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  • Marc Maron is releasing his fourth CD today on Comedy Central Records. "This Has to Be Funny" is available as a CD or mp3 download. (BTW, for long-time Maron followers, that's his cat Boomer on the cover). Recently, Marc gave the keynote address at the annual Just for Laughs festival in Montreal. (You can find the text and the audio here). The speech is a moving commentary on the importance of continuing to believe in yourself, and continuing to do good work, even when times are hard. It sends an important message to creators everywhere: Never give up.
  • Congrats to the team behind "It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia"! FX recently picked up two more seasons of "Sunny" which will make it the longest-running live-action comedy on basic cable. The show will return to your screens on September 15th and later this fall our Canadian listeners will be able to join in the fun as the network plans to launch FX Canada on November 1st.
  • Speaking of FX, we're also getting excited about the upcoming season premiere of the quick-witted animated spy comedy "Archer" featuring TSOYA alums Chris Parnell and H. Jon Benjamin. The network will air the first three episodes of the third season in mid-September reserving the rest until early 2012. If you haven't been following the adventures of Sterling Archer, you're missing some of the fastest and cleverest dialogue on television. You can check out the first season on Netflix, but I recommend buying the DVD of that season as it features some very funny and unusual bonus materials.
  • The movie "30 Minutes or Less" featuring Jesse Eisenberg, Nick Swardson and TSOYA alum Aziz Ansari will be released on August 12th.
  • Kids in the Hall alums Kevin McDonald and Scott Thompson are touring comedy clubs around the nation with a new show called Two Kids, One Hall. The show, which will feature stand up and sketch elements, as well as an appearance by favorite classic character Buddy Cole, will tour for about three months. Their next performances will be August 11th - 13th at the Punchline in Atlanta. If you want to know when the show is coming to your town, you can check out their tour dates here.
  • In order to build anticipation around the upcoming new Dr. Who episodes that will begin airing on August 27th, BBC America is releasing a series of Who-themed specials featuring a diverse plethora of TSOYA alums including Chris Hardwick, Reggie Watts, and Scott Adsit. The first special, "Doctor Who: Best of the Doctor", will air on Saturday, August 13 at 9/8c.

Jascha Hoffman - "Some Hungry Guy" - Little Nemo Video

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Our video guy Benjamin Ahr Harrison is in his real life a music video director. Above is his latest project, a mesmerizing Little Nemo-themed effort for an artist named Jascha Hoffman. Great work, Ben!

Singer-Songwriter Bob Mould, of Hüsker Dü and Sugar: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Bob Mould

This week, guest host Dave Holmes is in for Jesse! Dave hosts FX’s DVD on TV, performs at LA’s Upright Citizens Brigade, and you can see him on the web with his series A Drink With Dave.

He speaks to singer-songwriter Bob Mould, who is one of the original members of seminal 1980s punk band Hüsker Dü. After leaving the band, he continued his music career with alternative rock band Sugar and his own solo projects.

His new memoir, See a Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody, goes deep into his past, exploring his personal history, his sexuality, band politics and more.

Click here for a full transcript of this interview.
OR
Stream or download this interview now.

DAVE HOLMES: It's The Sound of Young America, I'm Dave Holmes, and my guest this week is Bob Mould. You might know him best as the founder of the 1980s Minneapolis punk band Hüsker Dü . The band only had modest record sales at the time, but they’ve been a huge influence on alternative rock. After the band broke up, Mould went on to release several solo recordings, and in the mid-90s he formed a new group called Sugar. Here's another fun fact: Mould wrote the theme song to The Daily Show, it's called “Dog On Fire.”

He's now written a memoir along with Michael Azerrad, it's called See A Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody. It follows his fascinating career as a gay guy both in and out of the closet in the alternative rock world of the 80s, 90s, and today.

Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Bob Mould!

BOB MOULD: How ya doing?

My Brother, My Brother and Me 66: Beaches: The Book of the Movie

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Unless this show ends up going on until the end of recorded time, this, our 66th episode, is likely to be our most satanic installment ever. We heard from this cool dude we met at our local incense store that if you play it backwards, you can hear all kinds of secret, totally psychedelic messages.

Suggested talking points: Bad Investments, Dream Spelunking, Dorm Warden, Looking at a Picture of Tracy Chapman, Mark Twain's Latest, Mighty Max Hash, Cool Urinal, Love Lawyers, The New Lunchbox

Podthoughts by Colin Marshall: Mohr Stories

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Vital stats:
Format: conversations about the comedy business and Jay Mohr’s life in it
Episode duration: 1h30m-2h
Frequency: weekly

It must speak to the weirdness of celebrity in our time that I’ve long known of Jay Mohr without knowing him from anything. Saturday Night Live claimed him as a performer for a little while, but I’ve never watched it. I remember seeing him in promos for a show called Action back in I think 1999 which looked neat, but mostly because Illeana Douglas’ eyes seem to follow you no matter where you stand in the room. But the dude’s got a mile-long IMDb page! He had his own big-time sitcom recently! He played some sort of sleazy fellow in Jerry Maguire!

I’ve learned a lot about all these elements of Jay Mohr’s career — and heard the promise of learning much more — from listening to the first five episodes of his joyfully conducted new podcast Mohr Stories [RSS] [iTunes]. Something tells me I wouldn’t have if I’d been following Jay Mohr-related buzz just a little more closely. He’s taken a beating lately, or so I gather from the talk on his show, for everything from his newly chunky weight to JPEGs of his wife’s oddly plastic-surgerized lips. No matter the work he puts into his comedy, a lot of comedy fans seem to write him off. Not long ago, Adam Carolla asked him the million-dollar-preventing question point-blank: why doesn’t anybody want to admit Jay Mohr is funny?

“I used to be a huge asshole,” Mohr said, and he says it again and again on Mohr Stories. If you believe his claims, he’s dedicated his show to pure honesty about his life and career, and even if I don’t know his career, I can always get down to hear anyone being completely upfront about anything. Mohr drops this honesty in the comfort of his own garage, surrounded by friends, fellow comics, his wife, his baby, and even his longtime manager. I won’t pretend they don’t spend lengthy stretches of the hour-and-a-half to two-hour episodes goofing around, but when they get into the nuts and bolts of the business of making people laugh — and the wider business of working with people who make people laugh — they reveal details I’ve heard nowhere else.

Sure, some of these details amount to nothing more than ways to trick the opener traveling the road with you to unsuspectingly gaze upon your exposed anus. (Mohr explains it better than I can.) Other times, he and his coterie talk about the intricate dynamics between a performer, his management, and the wider world, or the complicated and chancy means by which a young comic rises in The Industry. Still other times, he discusses how he came into possession of a story about smoking PCP with Tracy Morgan, how he gained that weight, what it’s like to work with Tom Cruise (“the sun,” Mohr calls him, though he also calls Chris Farley that), or how, exactly, Bobcat Goldthwait broke up with Mohr’s wife before she was Mohr’s wife. (Still no word on those lip injections, though.)

Given my lack of experience in the realm of comedy, I found special fascination in Mohr and co.’s disquisition on the specific joys of performing for black audiences [MP3]. They even go over all the intricate levels of black-people applause, some of which involve grabbing and shaking anyone close at hand, and others of which involve getting out of their seats and doing laps around the theater. Wait, should I call this racist? Should I call Mohr’s impressions of Tracy Morgan racist, even though I laugh at all of them? (But I assure you I laugh at the satire of Morgan’s spacily emphatic manner of speech, not his race.) Should I call the oft-recurring joke about what Florida black families sound like at the beach racist? (But I laugh reflexively at every joke containing the word “kingfish!”) Even Mohr himself has instituted a Mohr Stories drinking game whose sole rule dictates that you drink whenever a white guy does an impression of a black guy. I can’t actually tell what, if any racism all this involves, but I feel a little bad about how I feel bad about how I don’t feel all that bad about it.

(Man, all those cultural studies classes in college messed me up.)

[Podthinker Colin Marshall also happens to host and produce The Marketplace of Ideas [iTunes], a public radio show and podcast dedicated to in-depth cultural conversation. Please hire him for something.]

Simon Thorn, Born August 5th, 2011

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My son Simon was born early yesterday morning. We're so happy to welcome him into our home and into the world.

We won't have a Jordan Jesse Go! this week, but we should continue on something like a normal schedule. For the next month or so, our capable producer Julia Smith will be helming The Sound of Young America, and we've got some amazing guest hosts lined up. Keep it locked.

"Louie" Renewed for a Third Season

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If the comedy nerd next to you just looked up from his laptop with tears of relief and joy in his eyes, it's probably because FX just announced that the network has renewed Louis C.K.'s Emmy-nominated show "Louie" for a third season.

That's my best guess, anyway. Truly wonderful news.

The Alumni Newsletter: August 5, 2011

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The Coup - Underdogs

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If this doesn't touch you...

One thing that Boots of The Coup always understood was that social change has to come from a human place. All the big revolution talk in the world won't move half the people this song will.

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