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Earl Weaver On Manager's Corner

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Contains a lot of swearing. Even better than Tommy Lasorda on Kingman's performance.

via John Moe.

Marc Maron Commentary on The Sound of Young America: RRL

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Marc Maron

Commentator Marc Maron says he's not ready to buy a belt pre-distressed by an Indian boy.

Prince - Head (Live in 1981)

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Sometimes I think "Dirty Mind" might surpass "Sign O the Times" as my favorite Prince album. SO MANY POWER JAMS.

Podthoughts by Colin Marshall: "CD Baby DIY Musician Podcast"

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Boy, CD Baby has come a long way. Once an upstart outfit whose vaguely sketchy, disreputable-feeling web site put your Podthinker off more than one purchase, they've become the hep place to be for emerging and/or unsigned musicians with product to move. They're so legitimate that they even produce a bunch of podcasts, the first of which, the CD Baby DIY Musician Podcast [iTunes] [XML], provides genuinely useful information to all the internet's up-and-coming singers, strummers, rappers, key-pressers, hitter-of-resonant-objects-with-sticks, etc.

From the sound of it, they need all the useful information they can get. It's well-known how steep a hill independent musicians face. Assuming they've got the chops, they then need, in no particular order, access to solid recording gear, a decent engineer, media contacts, a compelling story, a modicum of professionalism, a road budget, venues to play, an open mind, some sort of lawyer, filled-out copyright paperwork, healthy fan relations, a strong grasp of social media, management, willingness to play weddings, a sharp mastering ear, a capacity to hold their liquor and enough money to cover taxes. (Also, the ability to podcast doesn't hurt.) If that list is as tiring to read as it was to write, think about how rough it must be to attain.

Fortunately, the CD Baby crew covers these (exact) subjects and others, clearly and conversationally, one at a time. Sometimes they do this in interviews with relevant music-industry figures, and sometimes they do this in roundtable discussions amongst themselves. For the former, they chat with folks like mid-level venue booker Alicia Rose [MP3], Max Fun favorite and success-by-Internet Jonathan Coulton [MP3], veteran publicist Alex Steininger [MP3], Hall counterpart John Oates [MP3] and rocka-ternt-indie-kids'-sanga Dan Zanes [MP3]. For the latter, they take on news, rumor, personal goings-on and such musician-affecting topics as potential concert mishaps [MP3], Twitter [MP3] and what, exactly, a "360 record deal" is [MP3].

Quibbles about increasingly busy, garish production aside, the podcast deserves accolades for the sheer applicability of the facts and recommendations it provides. The advice given by guests and hosts alike is always understandable, reasonable and, most importantly, actable-on; nothing they tell the listening musician to do lies too far outside their reach. Some of the commentators seem to believe they're providing the cold, bracing splash of reality that these poor, naïve bands and solo artists so badly need, and maybe they are, but nothing said on the program strikes your Podthinker as especially harsh. Making oneself into a successful musician seems, at bottom, no different than founding and operating any sort of business venture: you do your branding, your product development, your advertising, your sales, your distribution, your networking.

But maybe indie musicians don't want to hear that. Your Podthinker, who only sits on the periphery of the DJing and ambient worlds himself, isn't quite sure. After listening to a few dozen episodes of the DIY Musician Podcast, he certainly feels relieved not to have to slug it out in the teeming arena of the struggling singer-songwriter, but nothing he heard was applicable only to said troubadorial combatants. It's advice for the working musician, sure, but anyone doing any type of creative work can and should take the lessons to heart.

Vital stats:
Format: music-biz interviews and roundtables
Running since: May 2007
Duration: 20m-70m
Frequency: semi-erratic weekly
Archive available on iTunes: all

[Questions, comments, ideas, suggestions or threats for Podthinker Colin Marshall? colinjmarshall at gmail.]

Jordan, Jesse Go! Ep. 112: Bananacakes with Seth and Jonathan from Uhh Yeah Dude

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Guests: 
Seth Romatelli
Guests: 
Jonathan Larroquette

Seth Romatelli and Jonathan Larroquette join Jesse and Jordan to talk about smart phones and dumb everything else.


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Our theme music: "Love You" by The Free Design, courtesy of The Free Design and Light in the Attic Records

The Roots - How I Got Over

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New video from the Roots crew. Thought's singing sounds a lot better than Captain Kirk's.

TSOYA Live in DC

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Date: 
10/24/2009 - 14:00 - 16:00
Show: 
City: 
Marriott Rennaisance Washington Hotel
Venue Name: 
Washington, D.C.

The Sound of Young America is coming to Washington, D.C. as part of the Bentzen Ball comedy festival. Admission is free!

Interviews with Mary-Lynn Rajskub and Ian MacKaye. Performances from Matt Braunger, Chelsea Perretti, and Hugh Moore.

Nathan Rabin, Author of The Big Rewind - Interview on TSOYA

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The Big Rewind: A Memoir Brought to You by Pop Culture
Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Nathan Rabin

Nathan Rabin has been the head writer of The Onion's AV Club for over ten years, his first book The Big Rewind: A Memoir Brought to You by Pop Culture delves into the unusual upbringing that helped create the pop-culture savant that we know and love today: in a way that's both hilarious and heartbreaking.

Podthoughts by Colin Marshall: "The Japanofiles"

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Nowadays, a westerner's profession of interest in Japan never comes as a surprise. Based on the ultrascientific sample consisting of your Podthinker's friends and acquaintances, being fascinated by Japan has actually become more common than not being fascinated by Japan. As recent a development as this feels like, the compulsion to explore the Land of the Rising Sun did, indeed, exist before 1997. The sort of Japanophilia we see today has, in one form or another, been around for decades and decades. Here to get in depth with a few of the game's longtime players is The Japanofiles [iTunes link] [RSS].

Hosting the program is Dave Carlson, an American with over 25 years of Japanthusiasm logged, in which he's aqcuired a Japanese wife, a half-Japanese kid and a couple places of Japanese residence. He appears to make his living the same way many foreigners in the country do: teaching English. He's therefore quite well tapped into the local expatriate community most of whom seem — whether or not this is an artifact of Carlson's social network remains a bit unclear — to make a living from their native mastery of the English language, by tutoring, translating, that sort of thing. (And even when they don't, they've all got intriguing stories. One of them, an Aussie who works in construction, even plays a blues song about the Cultural Revolution.) Carlson's interviewed one fellow who owns and operates a children's English school [MP3], for example, and one who translates the Vampire Hunter D novels [MP3].

Despite Japanophilia's modern currency, this show refreshingly avoids pretty much all predictable angles. First and foremost, there's not a single segment about big Japanese cities and how crazy they are. No stories of "Tokyo weirdness" here, especially since Carlson isn't based in Tokyo. He generally sticks to his own neck of the woods, the 227,000-populated city of Matsumoto in Nagano prefecture, which you'll perhaps recall from the 1998 winter Olympics. The program's not only geographically rooted in its country, it's geographically rooted even more locally, which makes the content that much more unusual and therefore interesting. The first episode finds Carlson at Matsumoto's Tour de Utsukushigahara bicycle race [MP3], capturing the ambient sound of the event and interviewing participants from all over the Anglosphere.

That on-location immediacy is one of the neatest parts of the podcast's production, and this happens to be one of the more pleasingly-produced podcasts your Podthinker has heard in some time. While far from flashy, it's got a clean, calm aesthetic about it, like a lot of what comes out of Japan. Its segments click together satisfyingly, and their content fits their form. Eschewing the kind of talk about anime, comics and games you can find in a hundred thousand other places on the internet, the conversations cover the subjects listeners might not normally think about — the best sort of subjects — such as the tricky process of obtaining a house in Japan [MP3]. While it's still early days — only seven episodes are available — and some of the interviews peter out more than finish strongly, The Japanofiles stands out as the most promising Japan-centric podcast your Podthinker has heard.

Vital stats:
Format: conversations about the Japanese expatriate life
Running since: July 2009
Duration: 23m-47m
Frequency: weekly-ish?
Archive available on iTunes: all

[Questions, comments, ideas, suggestions or threats for Podthinker Colin Marshall? colinjmarshall at gmail.]

Jordan, Jesse, Go!: Episode 111: Richmond

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Guests: 
Karen Kilgariff

Karen Kilgariff joins Jesse and Jordan to talk about Dennis Richmond, getting punched in the face and more.


Download This Episode (MP3 Link)
Discuss the episode on the forum
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ACTION ITEMS:

CONTINUING ACTION ITEMS:

* Do you have a dispute Judge John Hodgman can solve on a future broadcast? Email it to us! Put Judge John in the subject line.
* Need advice? ASK JUANITA!
* Share your Momentous Occasions and Moments of Shame!

Call 206-984-4FUN to share your thoughts on these ACTION ITEMS.

Our theme music: "Love You" by The Free Design, courtesy of The Free Design and Light in the Attic Records

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