Rendered

Rendered (formerly Destination DIY) finds stories about getting creative, making meaning, and breaking rules. We are an independent show from the public radio world carefully crafted for an audience of makers, doers, and curious minds.
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The Last Episode of Rendered

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Show: 
Rendered

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Rendered is retiring. It was not an easy decision, but it was necessary. This has been a labor of love for me and my team for many years now. Even though Rendered has only been around for a few episodes, many of you know that the show had a long history under the name “Destination DIY” before that. You may also know that Rendered is something that everyone who works on the show does in our spare time. (I also have a full-time job as a radio producer for a daily talk show.) I love making the show, but I realized that this way of working is just not sustainable. And that’s especially true because I’m about to take on a new DIY project: becoming a mom. My son is due in January and I expect that once he’s here I won’t have a lot of time outside of work.

But that’s really not the only reason that I decided to retire Rendered. I love the work of making the show. It’s given me so much creative freedom and endless opportunities to learn new things. But there’s a lot of other, non-creative work that I’ve taken on behind the scenes in order to keep it going. I actually own my own business. It’s not profitable, but I still have to file taxes for it every year. I keep track of invoices and W9s, apply for grants and, as you know, raise money from listeners. I also manage our social media accounts, update our website, maintain our mailing list etc. And when I decided to start my own radio show, I really didn’t think about any of that stuff. It just kind of built up over time. And doing all the administrative tasks took away from the time I was able to spend doing the creative work of actually making the show. So, my goal now is to keep making radio stories that you’ll be able to hear on other shows, but I just don’t have the capacity to keep up with the responsibilities of sustaining my own show anymore.

I wanted to make this Last Episode, mainly as a way to thank all of the great people who have helped to keep the show going over the years — from my amazing team to people who have been guests on the show and especially you, the listeners. The fact that you thought this show was worth your time means a whole, whole lot.

Archived shows will have a permanent home on the web and the URL http://renderedradio.org will point there soon.

Ongoing monthly donations will continue to support Maximum Fun programming and if you'd like to make any changes to your membership, you can do that here. Now that the show is ending, we will no longer be receiving funds from Maximum Fun.

You may have some questions about what happens next. Feel free to email me at julie(at)renderedradio(dot)org.

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Etsy's Response To Our Most Recent Episode

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Etsy's senior manager of public relations, Nikki Summer, sent the following email in response to our latest episode. I'm posting it here in the interest of transparency.

Hi Julie,

Thanks for sharing the link. And thanks for including us in the discussion of these topics, which we take seriously and try to approach as thoughtfully as we can here at Etsy. We’re eager to engage with our community on these and other issues. I did want to clarify a few points:

Starting at 5:30, you introduce the topic of how Etsy “weeds out the bad actors,” including those who violate Etsy policies and those who violate IP laws. Heather then goes on to discuss how Etsy does that with our engineers, community-generated flags, etc., referring to items that are flagged for violating Etsy policies, not for violating IP. As I mentioned to you in my follow-up email to you after the interview, Etsy cannot remove items for IP infringement until and unless we receive a proper takedown notice from the IP rights holder. From 5:30 to 7:10 in the segment, the issues of removing items for violating Etsy policies and for IP reasons are conflated, which is confusing and misleading to listeners.

It’s important to acknowledge, as you did, that IP as a whole is “squishy,” but it would have been helpful to your listeners to refer to the stats from our transparency report, or at the least mention the transparency report.

We’ve heard, and continue to hear, from our sellers about our policies allowing sellers to work with outside manufacturers. We know it is a sensitive issue for many, and we’re so grateful to have such a passionate, invested community. For many sellers, working with an outside manufacturing partner has allowed them to grow, expand and diversify their businesses in a way they couldn’t have done before. The Rendered segment, however, features none of those voices.

It’s also worth noting that as of June 30, we have approved 4700 sellers (out of 1.5 million total active sellers) to work with outside manufacturers.

When discussing the fact that Etsy reviews outside manufacturing applications, that would have been a terrific opportunity to mention that we have a whole team, the Responsible Seller Growth team, made up of maker specialists who review each and every application to ensure the seller is adhering to our principles of authorship, responsibility and transparency.

As you say in the segment, our sellers are the lifeblood of Etsy, and we cannot overstate how much we value them, their perspectives and their incredibly hard work. If you’re planning to explore any of these issues further in depth and give them the breadth of discussion they deserve, we’d love to work with you.

Thanks.

Best,
Nikki

Rendered #7 Etsy Speaks

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image credit: Marc Wathieu via Flickr, Creative Commons
Show: 
Rendered
Guests: 
Heather Jassy, Senior Vice President of Members & Community at Etsy
Guests: 
Miriam Gottfried, Wall Street Journal reporter

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Back in April, we talked about the online crafty marketplace Etsy going public, how the company has changed over the past 10 years, and what all of that means to the makers who sell their goods on the site. But there was an important voice missing from that show. (I couldn't interview anyone from Etsy because the company was in the mandated “quiet period” ahead of the IPO.)

Today, we get some responses to sellers' concerns about the direction the company is taking with Heather Jassy, Senior Vice President of Members & Community at Etsy and check in with Wall Street Journal reporter Miriam Gottfried to discuss the erratic performance of Etsy's stock over the past four months. We'll also talk about the looming threat on the horizon: a handmade marketplace on Amazon.

Special thanks to Etsy sellers Abby Glassenberg and Susie Ghahremani along with former Etsy seller Grace Dobush for lending their insights to this developing story.

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Rendered #6 Farming Creativity

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photo by Niko Kwiatkowski
Show: 
Rendered
Guests: 
Narendra Varma, co-founder of Our Table Cooperative
Guests: 
Amanda Oborne, vice president of food & farms at Ecotrust
Guests: 
Jeff Harvey, president & CEO of Burgerville

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Here at Rendered, we're all about creativity, whether that means literally making something or solving a problem creatively. In this episode, we're focused on the latter. Getting back to the kind of robust, regional food system that used to be the norm in America definitely requires some creative thinking. Medium-sized farms are key to this effort, but many of them lack the infrastructure they need to expand and be sustainable. These are the farms that are too big to sell everything they grow directly to consumers through farmers' markets or CSAs, but too small to compete in the commodity markets. Our Table Cooperative in Sherwood, Oregon is one such farm. In this episode, you'll hear from Our Table co-founder Narendra Varma, as well as others who are working to support the kind of food system our grandparents took for granted.

If you want to learn more about the Ecotrust report mentioned on this show, you can find it here.

Check out the photos of Our Table Cooperative taken by Rendered intern Niko Kwiatkowski

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Rendered #5 Mighty Tieton

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The view looking west down Wisconsin Ave. in Tieton, WA. Photo by Phoebe Flanigan
Show: 
Rendered
Guests: 
Ed Marquand, founder of Mighty Tieton
Guests: 
Stanley Hall, Mayor of Tieton
Guests: 
Jackie Williams, owner of Orchard Monkeys
Guests: 
Kerry Quint, co-founder of Goathead Press

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How did a detour, a patch of goathead thorns, and a flat bike tire change one guy's life, and bring an economic boost to a sleepy, little town?

Welcome to Tieton, Washington. Population: 1,200. In some ways, it’s your quintessential small town: three churches, an antique shop, a couple of cafes. No highway, no railroad. For the most part, people make their money farming apples. But unlike most other farming towns in the region, Tieton is also something of a destination for artists and urban creatives from across the country. In this episode, we take a close look at how these people ended up in Tieton — and how their presence there has changed this town.

This story was produced by Phoebe Flanigan with help from Team Rendered.

Find out more about the Mighty Tieton organization and check out Phoebe's photos:

Created with flickr slideshow.

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Rendered #4 Shakespeare In Detroit

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Shakespeare In Detroit's production of "Romeo & Juliet"
Show: 
Rendered
Guests: 
Sam Whilte, artistic director for Shakespeare In Detroit
Guests: 
Hugh M. Duneghy II, actor
Guests: 
Vanessa Sawson, actress
Guests: 
Kennikki Jones, actress
Guests: 
Thomas Klug, director of the Institute of Detroit Studies at Marygrove College

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Sam White saw potential in Detroit's dramatic struggle that no one else seemed to see — the perfect setting for Shakespeare's plays. Her company, Shakespeare In Detroit, performs in locations all over the city — in parks, at a YMCA and, once, in the old Lincoln Motor Factory. It's a scrappy company that depends on crowdfunding and nonprofit partnerships, with a mission to make Shakespeare accessible to a wide range of audiences. And the politics of the Motor City itself are often on Sam's mind when she's considering how to approach a production.

This story comes from producer Caitlin Pierce. Special thanks to Anna Sale of WNYC's Death, Sex & Money podcast for her help with this episode.

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OMG! Rendered Merch is Here!

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Rendered T-shirts, tote bags, and buttons are now available in the MaxFun store!
Why don't you head over there and treat yourself to something nice?




Rendered #3 Etsy: DIY to IPO

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An image from Etsy's prospectus, filed with the SEC
Show: 
Rendered
Guests: 
Miriam Gottfried, Wall Street Journal reporter
Guests: 
Grace Dobush, writer, crafter, former Etsy seller
Guests: 
Abby Glassenberg, blogger, crafter, Etsy seller
Guests: 
Susie Ghahremani, illustrator, Etsy seller

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On April 16, Etsy became a publicly traded company. This episode explores what that means for makers who use the site to sell their wares, and for Etsy's reputation.

Over the past decade, Etsy has honed its image as the place to go online to buy goods directly from the people who made them — from hand-knitted sweaters and custom furniture to more bizarre items like soap in the shape of a Thanksgiving turkey and jewelry made from dentures. But the company has also waded into some thorny issues, like how to define "handmade."

Etsy's policy changes and rapid growth have alienated some sellers, like Grace Dobush, who recently decided to shut down her store after many years on the site. But others like, Abby Glassenberg, say Etsy is a valuable tool for a crafty business-owner. Susie Ghahremani has been on Etsy from the very beginning and she says she'll stick with the site, but she's also re-launching her own online store because she's unsure about where Etsy is headed in the future and what that could mean for her business.

You'll hear from all three of these sellers on this episode, along with Wall Street Journal reporter Miriam Gottfried as well as writer/performer Jason Rouse, who served as the voice of Etsy. The words you hear from Etsy in this episode came from the Etsy prospectus, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in March. (Etsy couldn't speak to me for this episode because they are in the mandated quiet period.)

You can also listen back to my 2011 interview with April Winchell about the now defunct Regretsy. And if you're wondering what April thinks about this whole IPO thing, she wrote about it for Motherboard.

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Rendered: Leftovers! PDX Carpet edition

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Rachel Maddow pays tribute to the PDX carpet with a picture of Julie's feet
Show: 
Rendered

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If our February episode was not enough to convince you that people go nuts for the Portland Airport carpet, my appearance on NPR's All Things Considered and my feet's appearance on news outlets across America + the Rachel Maddow Show should be sufficient. It's a thing — a crazy, crazy thing.

And I promised that if we made it to 150 people supporting Rendered through the MaxFunDrive, I would share some of the tidbits that got left out of the PDX Carpet Love Story episode. We blew that goal OUT OF THE WATER thanks to you, our awesome listeners. 201 of you threw your support behind Rendered, which means we'll get to keep making shows for you for the foreseeable future.

As a token of thanks, here are some gems I was truly sad to leave out of the PDX carpet episode, including some people who were cut out entirely. I'm so glad you'll get to hear from them! If you'd like, you can also get your own little piece of the carpet when they become available in a few months.

(I do understand if you've heard enough about the stupid carpet. We will be releasing a new, full episode later this month that has nothing to do with floor coverings of any kind.)

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Rendered: Leftovers! Choose Your Own Adventure

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Show: 
Rendered
Guests: 
All your favorites from the Choose Your Own Adventure episode!

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You've heard our Choose Your Own Adventure episode. Now, listen to the leftovers! That is, the stuff we hated to cut out of the show, but just couldn't squeeze in for various reasons including:

  • What happened when Ray Montgomery & Shannon Gilligan's trip to Belize took a wrong turn
  • Sexist assumptions on the part of the publishing industry
  • The crushing rejection Doug Wilhelm went through with his first book


And much more!

Thanks so much for your support. One more week to go in the MaxFunDrive! If you haven't done it yet, please help us get to 150 new & upgrading members for Rendered!

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