Bootsy Collins

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: The Pointer Sisters and Bootsy Collins

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
The Pointer Sisters
Guests: 
Bootsy Collins

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The Pointer Sisters on going from being mid-size R&B stars to huge, mega hit makers

[r]The Pointer Sisters ruled the 1980s with hits like "I'm So Excited" and "Jump (For My Love)." Growing up in Oakland, California, they had a reverend father who taught them that rock and roll was "the devil's work." But when their parents were not around, they snuck in listening sessions to Elvis, The Supremes, and James Brown.

Bonnie and June Pointer were the first to form the group in 1969, and they were followed by Ruth and Anita in later years. They recorded their debut self-titled album in 1973, and the single "Yes We Can Can" became their first hit.

Ruth and Anita joined Jesse in 2014 to talk about their vintage style, forging their own musical path, and mixing family with business.

Learn more about the Pointer Sisters by visiting their website.

Listen to The Pointer Sisters' interview!

Bootsy Collins on funk, LSD and more

Bootsy Collins is a funk legend. A bassist by happenstance, in his teen years Bootsy was discovered and hired by James Brown to be part of the band The J.B.'s. At only 19, Bootsy was on the rise and made the move to play with another inventive and pioneering funk artist, George Clinton, as part of Funkadelic-Parliment up until the formation of his own band Bootsy's Rubber Band.

In 2011, Bootsy spoke to Jesse about sharing the stage with James Brown, experimenting with LSD, the freedom he felt with the Parliament-Funkadelic collective and his solo career.

Bootsy is currently working on his 14th solo album, World Wide Funk. Keep up with the latest on Bootsy by visiting his website.

Listen to Jesse's 2011 interview with Bootsy Collins!

The Outshot: The Muppet Movie (1979)

Say what you want about the Muppets. Maybe you didn't like the new movies, maybe you missed the TV show. Jesse tells you why the original Muppet Movie is still a classic.

Listen to this week's Outshot!

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Bootsy Collins, Oliver Wang on Al Green

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Looking for information on this week's episode of Bullseye?

Ahh...The Name Is Bootsy, Baby! Bootsy Collins Pushes James Brown's Buttons and Gets Wild with George Clinton's P-Funk

Bootsy Collins is a legend in the world of funk. He's a bassist who came to his instrument by happenstance and fell in love. He was only in his teens when he was discovered and hired by the Godfather of Soul, James Brown, to be part of his backing band, The J.B.'s. Bootsy went on to play with another notoriously inventive and pioneering funk artist, George Clinton, as part of Funkadelic and Parliament.

He continued the funk with Bootsy's Rubber Band and a number of other musical collaborations. His most recent album is Tha Funk Capitol Of The World, and he currently teaches bass at his own Funk University. He's also playing a couple of festivals this spring and summer.

Bootsy talks to us about being on the forefront of funk, playing with James Brown, doing LSD on stage, quitting and/or being fired from The JB's, pushing the boundaries of black popular music with George Clinton, and his own amazing solo career.

He and Jesse spoke in 2011. Find an extended version of that original conversation here.

The Dissolve Talks about All-Time Favorite Movies: "Real Life" and "To Be or Not to Be"

This week, a look back at some all-time favorite movies from our pals at The Dissolve. Staff writer Nathan Rabin and Editorial Director Keith Phipps join us to talk about some of their all-time favorite films.

Nathan recommends Albert Brooks' 1979 satire Real Life, a prescient look at documenting "real life" in pre-reality television times.

Keith recommends the 1942 Ernst Lubitch classic To Be or Not to Be (Criterion Collection), starring Jack Benny and Carole Lombard.

Canonball with Oliver Wang: Al Green’s I’m Still In Love With You

In Canonball, we take a flying leap into the canon of popular music. We're joined by professor and music writer Oliver Wang to talk about an Al Green album that deserves your attention. No... it's not Green's chart-topper, Let's Stay Together. Wang says that it was Al Green's followup to that album that really rattled him to his core.

Wang talks to us about 1973's I'm Still in Love with You, the record that created a new kind of soul music. Green's beautiful, if flawed voice, was merged with Willie Mitchell's innovative rhythm section and a new sound emerged.

You can find Oliver Wang's thoughts on soul rarities and more on his blog, Soul Sides.

The Outshot: Orson Welles's F for Fake

Jesse recommends Orson Welles' final masterwork, F for Fake. Part documentary, part film essay, it features tricks and truths layered atop each other, creating a mesmerizing narrative.

Bootsy Collins with The Roots on Jimmy Fallon - Tonight!

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See this week's guest on The Sound -- funk bass legend Bootsy Collins -- with The Roots and Yo Gabba Gabba on tonight's Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. They'll be funking it up with a great song written by friend of MaxFun Adam Deibert and Jarond Gibbs.

Listen to this week's interview, then don't miss Bootsy's performance at 12:35/11:35c on NBC.

Bootsy Collins, Legendary Funk Bassist: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Bootsy Collins

Bootsy Collins is a legend in the world of funk. He's a bassist who came to his instrument by happenstance and fell in love. He was only in his teens when he was discovered and hired by the Godfather of Soul, James Brown, to be part of his backing band known as The J.B.'s. Bootsy went on to play with another notoriously inventive and pioneering funk artist, George Clinton, as part of Funkadelic and Parliament.

He continued the funk with Bootsy's Rubber Band and a number of other musical collaborations. He recently released a new album, Tha Funk Capitol Of The World, and he currently teaches bass at his own Funk University.

Bootsy talks to us about being on the forefront of funk, playing with James Brown, doing LSD on stage, quitting and/or being fired from the JB's, joining up with the Parliament-Funkadelic collective, and his own amazing solo career.

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