film

"F For Fake"

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Above: Peter Bogdanovich talks about Orson Welles' cinematic essay "F For Fake." If you've never seen the film, see it. Like... NOW. One of my five favorite films of all time. It's a meditation on the nature of authorship, storytelling and authenticity. Issues that were important when Welles made the film, in the 70s, but have only grown more important since. It's also very funny, as well as profound.

Below is the scene that Bogdanovich alludes to in his remarks: an exploration of one of man's greatest achievements, the cathedral at Chartres.

The AV Clubs Picks for April 2011: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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Paul Dano in Meek's Cutoff
Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Keith Phipps
Guests: 
Scott Tobias

We're joined by Keith Phipps, the AV Club's editor and Scott Tobias, the AV Club's film editor to discuss picks in music and movies for April 2011. They discuss the film Meek's Cutoff, which follows a group on the Oregon Trail, and Certified Copy, a drama starring Juliette Binoche, both currently in theaters. On Blu-Ray, we have Dario Argento's horror film Inferno. Finally, Keith talks a little about the musician Kurt Vile's release, Smoke Ring for My Halo.

JESSE THORN: It's The Sound of Young America, I'm Jesse Thorn. Once a month or so we check in with our friends at the AV Club to help us separate the wheat from the chaff of the world of popular culture. This month we're joined by Keith Phipps, the AV Club's editor, and Scott Tobias, the film editor of the AV Club. Gentlemen, welcome back to The Sound of Young America.

SCOTT TOBIAS: Well hello.

KEITH PHIPPS: Thanks for having us.

Click here for a full transcript of this interview.

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Barry Gordon, Co-Star of A Thousand Clowns: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Barry Gordon

From our special screening of the film A Thousand Clowns at Cinefamily in Los Angeles, a special podcast-only episode of The Sound of Young America: Jesse's conversation with Barry Gordon, the then-15-year-old co-star of the film. Released in 1965 and now out-of-print, the movie stars Jason Robards as Murray, a comedy writer who struggles to come to terms with growing up – something he must do if he wants to stop child protective services from taking away his adopted son Nick, played by Barry Gordon.

Barry Gordon was a child actor who played the role of Nick on the Broadway and touring versions of A Thousand Clowns before making the film; he's since, by turn, been a voice actor, a lawyer, the president of the Screen Actors Guild, a talk show host, a teacher and even a congressional candidate. One of his recent projects has been hosting Left Talk with Barry Gordon. We're very pleased he could join us for this special screening and Q&A, and many thanks go to him and the Cinefamily for helping us put on this event.

The film has finally come back into print - you can get it from Amazon by following this link.

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Jesse Hosts the Spirit Awards Nomination Special

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Hey, remember that time I hosted the Spirit Awards Nomination Special? And Eva Mendes touched my leg and acted like we were friends?

No?

Well watch this. Then you will remember it.

What's "A Thousand Clowns" About?

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Tonight at Cinefamily in Los Angeles we're presenting a screening of A Thousand Clowns. If you asked me what it was about, I'd probably say it's about comedy, the pain of show business and what it means to be an adult. It's also about Irving R. Feldman's Birthday, the great under-celebrated national holiday, and a million other things. (As the poster can attest.)

It occurs to me that I have three "favorite movies." They're this one, Rushmore and Pee-Wee's Big Adventure. Pee-Wee is about a man-child. Rushmore is about a child-man. A Thousand Clowns is about a man-child's relationship with a child-man. I guess I have some growing up issues.

Tickets are only ten bucks for the show tonight, and I'll be interviewing Barry Gordon, who starred alongside Jason Robards in both the Broadway play and the film. He went on to become a lawyer and eventually served as president of the Screen Actors' Guild.

See you tonight at Cinefamily.

The Spirit Awards!

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The kind folks at IFC invited me to host The Spirit Awards Nomination Special. You can watch it and see me interact with a very actor-y Jeremy Renner, the very charming Eva Mendes, and the very funny (and distressingly handsome) Joel McHale. You can also find out who was nominated for the only big awards show that consistently awards really great movies.

You can catch it on IFC starting Saturday:
Sat 02/05/11 12:00PM (premier)
Tue 02/08/11 09:30AM
Sun 02/13/11 03:30PM
Tue 02/15/11 02:30PM
Thu 02/24/11 12:00PM

The VCR Plus code is THEREISNOSUCHTHINGASVCRPLUSANYMORE. So just type that into your betamax and we'll be all set!

You should rent Macgruber.

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I know... you missed it in the theater.

But you can rent it.

And you should.

Judge John Hodgman Ep. 4: Tear Down That Wall

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This week on the Judge John Hodgman Podcast, a dispute between friends. Foy argues that breaking the fourth wall ruins film and theater. His friend Matt disagrees. Only Judge John Hodgman can decide.

To listen to this week's Judge John Hodgman podcast, subscribe in iTunes or using this feed.

Discuss the ruling on our forum here.

Judah Friedlander: World Champion, 30 Rock Star, Author of How To Beat Up Anybody: Interview on The Sound of Young America Live at WNYC

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Judah Friedlander


Photo credit WNYC and Casey De Pont.

Judah Friedlander is a regular on NBC's 30 Rock and the author of How To Beat Up Anybody. He is the World Champion.

Judah joined us on our live show at WNYC to discuss the differences between a Yeti, a Sasquatch and a Bigfoot (and how to beat up all three). He also delineated his strategies for fighting groups of people and even groups of strippers.

When Friedlander's not beating people up, he plays writer Frank Rossitano on 30 Rock. He's had a long and successful career on stage as a standup comic, and his film roles include an acclaimed turn as the Original Nerd, Toby in "American Splendor."

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Lee Unkrich, Director of Toy Story 3 and Pixar Veteran: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Lee Unkrich

Lee Unkrich is the director of Toy Story 3. He's worked at Pixar for more than 15 years, and co-directed Finding Nemo, Monsters Inc. and Toy Story 2. Before he worked at Pixar, he was an editor in non-animated film = his credits include a TV movie called "Separated By Murder" and the erotic TV thriller Silk Stalkings.

Lee talked with us about being a non-animator in an animation company, and what his traditional film-making skills mean in a Pixar context. He also talks about introducing themes of mortality into kids' movie, and the pressure of making a Pixar film.

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