podcast

My Brother, My Brother and Me 153: God Made a Bridge Troll

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Who will live? Who will die? Who will be betrayed? Whose terrible secrets will be revealed? Find out on this thrilling season finale of MBMBaM. And join us next week, for more, new MBMBaM.

Suggested talking points: Sweeps, In Vino Punchitas, Bully Vibe, A Cat Called Burden, Thinner and Closer, Farm Wisdom, Beeeeeees

Jordan, Jesse, Go! Episode 276: Dropped a Baby with Natasha Muse

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Guests: 
Natasha Muse

Comedian Natasha Muse joins Jordan and Jesse for a discussion of rare Dr. Pepper, artisanal pickling, and Jordan talks about his trip to Nicolas Cage's estate sale.

Ep. 11: Birth Stories

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Show: 
One Bad Mother

WARNING! This week, Biz and Theresa share their birth stories. If you are even slightly hesitant to hear such personal details, we suggest you go with your instincts and listen to our Mother's Day episode...again. Otherwise, settle in to hear about the miracle of birth in explicit, disturbing detail.

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Show Music
Opening theme: Summon the Rawk, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Tight, Shayna Ferm and the Upper Deckers
Mom Song, Adira Amran, Hot Jams For Teens (www.adiraamram.com, available on iTunes)
Closing music: Mama Blues, Cornbread Ted and the Butterbeans (www.cornbreadted.com and available on iTunes)

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Mel Brooks and Directors of "The Source Family"

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Mel Brooks
Guests: 
Maria Demopoulos
Guests: 
Jodi Wille
Guests: 
Andrew Noz

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to the show in iTunes or via the RSS feed, or check out our SoundCloud page to share any or all of these interviews or recommendations!

Hip Hop Recommendations from Andrew Noz: Juice by Chance The Rapper and Picacho by Young Thug (feat. Maceo)

Andrew Noz joins us to provide some recommendations from the world of hip hop. First, he talks to us about Chance the Rapper's self-proclaimed lyrical challenge, as evidenced in Juice, a track off his latest mixtape, Acid Rap. And what if Lil Wayne stayed off the beaten pop music path? It might sound like Young Thug's weirded-out track, Picacho.

Andrew Noz is the columnist for Pitchfork's Hall of Game, and also blogs and Tumblr-s regularly at Cocaine Blunts and Tumblin 'Erb.

Embed and Share Hip Hop Recommendations from Andrew Noz: Juice by Chance The Rapper and Picacho by Young Thug (feat. Maceo)


Mel Brooks catching up on the present in between takes of History Of The World: Part I. (Photo by Pamela Barkentin Blackburn.)

Mel Brooks Takes Down Hitler (and Makes a Few Wonderfully Bad Jokes Along the Way)

It's hard to imagine what American comedy would look like without Mel Brooks. With a sharp eye for parody, a seemingly infinite supply of gags, and enough destruction of the fourth wall to make a postmodern novelist blush, his work has set the tone for countless comedy TV shows and films. It's hard to imagine SNL's relentless TV parodies without Your Show Of Shows (which Brooks wrote for alongside Sid Caesar back in the 50s), The Simpsons without his filmography full of sly pop-culture references, or the careers of Airplane! creators Zucker, Abrahams and Zucker without Brooks' shameless love of (self-admittedly) awful jokes.

A new PBS American Masters documentary, Mel Brooks: Make A Noise, explores the life and career of the EGOT winner and man behind The Producers, Young Frankenstein, Blazing Saddles, and so much more. Brooks talks to us about fighting in World War II (where he managed to even make a few Germans laugh), the genius of Gene Wilder, and that time Sid Caesar dangled Brooks out the window of a Chicago hotel room.

PBS's American Masters documentary Mel Brooks: Make A Noise premieres Monday, May 20. Check with your public television station for local listings. A box set from Shout! Factory with over ten hours of rare and exclusive footage was also released late last year.

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Directors Maria Demopoulos and Jodi Wille on The Source Family, LA's Most Famous Hippie Cult

The Source Family fit the conventional image of a typical hippie cult in a lot of ways – assuming, of course, that there is such a thing as a typical hippie cult. You could point to the commune, the long hair, the Jesus-y robes...not to mention occasional hits of what they called "sacred herb". Dig deeper, though, and it becomes clear that there was plenty that separated the Source Family from stereotypes.

The group was just as unique as their leader, a man who called himself Father Yod. He was a former Marine, stuntman, jujitsu expert who founded the Source Family alongside a highly successful vegetarian restaurant. Out of the back of that restaurant, the family sold recordings of their regular jam sessions, which became the stuff of psychedelic rock legend. Perhaps most unlike your average cult leader, Father Yod was not particularly attached to any particular ideology – not even his own. In direct violation of his own commandments, Yod married thirteen wives, a move which both alienated a number of family members and caught the LAPD's attention. This caused the Source Family to flee to Hawaii, which ultimately resulted in the group's demise.

We're delving further into LA's most famous hippie cult with the help of Maria Demopoulos and Jodi Wille, the directors of a new documentary called The Source Family. They discuss the group's run-ins with celebrities (and law enforcement), why Father Yod once told his followers to cut their hair and get jobs, and whether or not they would have joined the group, if given the chance.

The Source Family is in limited nationwide theatrical release. For information about screenings at a theater near you, check out the film's website.

(Embed or share Directors Maria Demopoulos and Jodi Wille on The Source Family, LA's Most Famous Hippie Cult)


The Outshot: Home Comforts by Cheryl Mendelson

This week, find out why Jesse's been spending a lot of time with Home Comforts by Cheryl Mendelson, a home-tome that gracefully runs the housekeeping gamut from sections titled "Administering Insurance Policies" to "Privacy, Sex, and the Constitution".

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Stop Podcasting Yourself 269 - Damonde Tschritter

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Guests: 
Damonde Tschritter

Comedian Damonde Tschritter returns to talk trucking, barbecue, and penguins.

Download episode 268 here. (right-click)

Get in touch with us at spy [at] maximumfun [dot] org or (206) 339-8328.

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Jordan, Jesse, Go! Episode 275: Ghost Zoo with John Roy

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Guests: 
John Roy

Comedian John Roy joins Jordan and Jesse for a discussion of Jordan's coyote attack, Cumberbitches, HBO programming, and morning radio.

My Brother, My Brother and Me 152: Heaton Up

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This week, Justin announces that he's ready to give the greatest Mother's Day gift of all: The gift of life. He's got a baby, in there. In that crazy womb of his.

Suggested talking points: Junior Disease, Complaints, Genny Up, Patricia Chiefin, Sexual Kobayashi Maru, Rattata Frittata, Homeland, Kid Court

Ep. 10: Mother's Day

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Show: 
One Bad Mother
Guests: 
Our Very Own Moms

Biz and Theresa get so sentimental talking about moms and motherhood that we decide to go straight to the source and call our own moms. (Oh, yeah -- and we spend some time blaming/threatening our husbands for not doing enough for us on Mother's Day! Of course.)

Subscribe to One Bad Mother in iTunes
Join our mailing list!
Follow One Bad Mother on Twitter
Follow Biz on Twitter
Follow Theresa on Twitter
Check us out on Facebook and like us!

Share your genius and fail moments! Call 206-350-9485

Show Music
Opening theme: Summon the Rawk, Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Anthem , Awesome, Beehive Sessions (http://awesomeinquotes.com, also avail on iTunes)
Mom Song, Adira Amran, Hot Jams For Teens (www.adiraamram.com, available on iTunes)
Beehive, Awesome, Beehive Sessions (http://awesomeinquotes.com, also avail on iTunes)
Telephone, Awesome, Beehive Sessions (http://awesomeinquotes.com, also avail on iTunes)
Closing music: Mama Blues, Cornbread Ted and the Butterbeans (www.cornbreadted.com and available on iTunes)

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Huey Lewis and Phone Phreaking with Phil Lapsley

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Huey Lewis
Guests: 
Phil Lapsley
Guests: 
Carolyn Kellogg

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to the show in iTunes or via the RSS feed, or check out our SoundCloud page to share these segments.

Book Recommendations from Carolyn Kellogg: Walden on Wheels and Life After Life

We're delighted to have blogger, book critic, and LA Times writer Carolyn Kellogg with us to give this week's pop culture picks. Her first suggestion is Ken Ilgunas's Walden on Wheels, a memoir about a three-year cross-country journey that he took to pay off his student loans. If you're looking for something from the world of fiction, Kellogg says to check out Kate Atkinson's Life After Life, a darkly funny novel about an early 20th century girl that Atkinson repeatedly (and gleefully) kills off over the course of the novel.

(Embed or Share Book Recommendations from Carolyn Kellogg: Walden on Wheels and Life After Life)

Huey Lewis on Making Music That Sounds Old and New All at Once

It seems strange now, but when Huey Lewis and The News released their first record in 1979, music executives weren't expecting them to become a huge success. With bombastic hair bands on one end of the rock spectrum and sneering punk rockers on the other, there didn't seem to be much of a place for Lewis and company's fun, bluesy pub-rock. But thumbing their noses at industry naysayers turned out to be the right move for Huey Lewis and The News. Case in point: 1983's Sports, their first record to hit number one on the Billboard charts.

Thirty years later, the band's commemorating the thirty-year anniversary of that album with an expanded re-issue of Sports, featuring remastered tracks and live versions of songs like "The Heart of Rock & Roll" and "I Want a New Drug". Huey Lewis sat down with Jesse to talk about the album that brought them to stardom, as well as his experiences writing songs for Back to the Future and Pineapple Express, how to stow away on an airplane to Europe (well, it worked in the seventies), and how a trip to Morocco convinced him that a career in music was possible.

Huey Lewis and The News' 30th Anniversary Edition of Sports will be released on May 14. For more information about the band and their US tour, you can check out their website.

(And as a bonus for our podcast listeners: want to hear about how Huey Lewis met Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Bob Dylan, and just about every other super-famous singer…all in one night? Then be sure to check out our extended interview with him on our SoundCloud page, where he talks about recording the eighties anthem "We Are The World".)

(Embed or Share Huey Lewis on Making Music That Sounds Old and New All at Once)


Phone phreaker Al Diamond in 1972

Writer Phil Lapsley on the Subculture of Phone Phreaking

Remember the seventies, before phones got smart? It was a simpler time. There were no apps, no texts, and jailbreaking was something you could only do in a prison. But there was still plenty of trouble to get into using a phone.

As Phil Lapsley explains in his new book, Exploding The Phone: The Untold Story of the Teenagers and Outlaws who Hacked Ma Bell, the early seventies marked the beginning of phone phreaking. Phreaking involved tricking the systems that controlled phone lines by re-creating frequencies that phones used to communicate with one another. Just by using a tone-generating device called a blue box, a phone phreaker could fool phone networks into connecting them to long-distance calls – calls that usually cost hundreds of dollars – for free. But it didn't take long for phone companies to take notice.

In this interview, Lapsley explains that phone phreaking changed the world as we know it. He talks about why phone companies were initially hesitant to prosecute phreakers, why enthusiasts involved with phreaking despite having no one in particular to call, and why Steve Jobs once said that there'd be no Apple without phone phreaking.

Exploding the Phone is available now. And if you pick up a copy of the book, keep an eye out for phone numbers in the text... They could lead you to some interesting places.

Embed or share Writer Phil Lapsley on the Subculture of Phone Phreaking

The Outshot: Antiques Roadshow

There's a pretty simple formula to Antiques Roadshow: someone comes in with a knickknack and has it assessed by an expert. Next comes everyone's favorite part: the big reveal, where they find out what their item is really worth. That's part's pretty great, Jesse says – but there's something about Antiques Roadshow that he loves even more.

Embed or share Jesse's Outshot: Antiques Roadshow

Jordan, Jesse, Go! Episode 274: Big Band with Dana Snyder

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Guests: 
Dana Snyder

Actor Dana Snyder joins Jordan and Jesse for a discussion of Jewish wizards, Wad Lord, and Jesse breaks down The Spinners' song, "Rubberband Man." Plus Jesse has a few big momentous occasions to announce.

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