Punk

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Chuck Klosterman

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Chuck Klosterman
Guests: 
Karina Longworth
Guests: 
Phillip Crandall

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Chuck Klosterman Explores Villainy with Kanye, Batman, LeBron: What Makes Someone a "Bad Guy"?

Chuck Klosterman has been thinking and writing about culture for over a decade. He's written several essay collections, nonfiction and novels, and for the past few years, he's written the weekly column as the "Ethicist" for the New York Times Magazine. In his newest book, he takes on, well… bad guys.

Klosterman looks at athletes, musicians, politicians, vigilantes and even fictional characters who have been framed as villains -- from Bill Clinton to Darth Vader to LeBron James -- and tries to deconstruct the stories we tell about them in I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined). The book is now available in paperback.

Klosterman tells us how we've got Machiavelli all wrong, why Batman works great as a fictional construct but fails as a real person, and why it's so easy to villainize professional athletes.

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Time Traveling Back to Early 80s Punk with 'Smithereens' and 'We Are the Best!'

Film critic Karina Longworth invites you to time travel back to the early 1980s to explore the punk rock dreams of young girls in Smithereens and We are the Best!.

She suggests checking out Smithereens from 1982, a kind of prequel to director Susan Seidelman's Desperately Seeking Susan, for the time capsule of 1980s fashions and New York City street scenes.

If you want a pure breath of fresh air and fun, go with 2013's We Are The Best!, a Danish-Swedish film from director Lukas Moodysson. An adaptation of a comic book authored by his wife Coco, the movie follows a crew of young girls in Stockholm who found respite from the cruelties of middle school in punk rock.

Longworth hosts the podcast You Must Remember This, which explores forgotten bits of Hollywood history.

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Hey You, Let's Party: Andrew WK and the Party Philosophy of "I Get Wet"

This week, Phillip Crandall takes on Andrew W.K.'s 2001 debut, I Get Wet. At the time of its release, the album got a lot of flack. A lot of people just weren't sure what to make of it. The cover art was a gory photo of Andrew with blood running down his face, the song titles and lyrics were absurdly simplistic. A critic at Pitchfork gave it the abysmal rating of 0.6 out of 10. Ten years later, Pitchfork reviewed the reissued record, and gave it an 8.6. What gives? Well, Crandall says the album has a purpose and a message that endures.

Phillip Crandall is the author of a critical analysis of I Get Wet for Bloomsbury's 33 1/3 series.

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The Outshot: Stuart Saves His Family and Drawing from the SNL Well

Lots of recurring characters and sketches from Saturday Night Live have spawned feature films. Some of them are great, and some don't hold up well for 90 minutes of screentime. Jesse takes a look at the Al Franken vehicle Stuart Saves His Family, because "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough, and doggone it, people like me!"

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Jeff Bridges, Bernie Glassman, H. Jon Benjamin and Mike Wiebe

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Jeff Bridges
Guests: 
Bernie Glassman
Guests: 
H. Jon Benjamin
Guests: 
Mike Wiebe
Guests: 
Marah Eakin
Guests: 
Nathan Rabin

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to the show in iTunes or via the RSS feed, or check out our SoundCloud page to share any or all of these interviews or recommendations!

And if you're in the San Francisco Bay area this weekend, come join us at a live taping of Bullseye at the Punchline Comedy Club as part of SF Sketchfest. We'll talk to 99% Invisible host Roman Mars, The Coup's MC Boots Riley, and more. Find tickets and more details here!

The AV Club Recommends: The Imposter and Frightened Rabbit's Pedestrian Verse

The AV Club's Head Writer Nathan Rabin and Music Editor Marah Eakin join us to share some favorite new releases.

Nathan recommends the new DVD release of the documentary film The Imposter: the gripping story of a man who impersonates a family's long-lost son. Marah suggests a listen to the new collaborative album by the Scottish indie band Frightened Rabbit, called Pedestrian Verse.

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Jeff Bridges and Bernie Glassman on Channeling the Zen of "The Dude"

Maybe you've seen the cult film The Big Lebowski. Maybe you've seen it more than once. The movie lends itself to repeat viewings: it's chock-full of amazing and delirious visuals and wickedly funny and quotable dialogue. But what kind of wisdom can one gain from The Dude, the film's chilled-out slacker hero who's trying simply to "abide"? Maybe the key to living a more Zen life?

The Dude himself, Oscar-winning actor Jeff Bridges, and the renowned buddhist teacher and social activist Roshi Bernie Glassman join us to talk about following The Dude's example, loving, living life and some of the other philosophical riffing from their new book, The Dude and the Zen Master.

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Getting "Faster and Louder" with The Dictators: Mike Wiebe on The Song That Changed My Life

Mike Wiebe, vocalist for the punk band The Riverboat Gamblers, reveals the song that changed his life: The Dictators' "Faster and Louder", from 1978's Bloodbrothers. The song showed Wiebe that goofiness and edge weren't mutually exclusive, and inspired the Gamblers' beginnings.

The Riverboat Gamblers have honed their brand of melodic punk rock over the past fifteen years. Last year saw the release of their sixth full-length album, The Wolf You Feed. The band kicks off a European tour this spring.

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H. Jon Benjamin on Archer, Bob's Burgers and an Unlikely Career in Voice Acting

H. Jon Benjamin is a writer, comedian and a prolific voice actor, but he's not exactly the man of a million voices. In fact, he's really the man of one voice, which depending on the setting could be the shiftless son on Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist, the misanthropic dad of Fox's Bob's Burgers, or a self-involved secret agent on FX's Archer. Benjamin has appeared in his own physical form on shows like Parks and Recreation, and in 2011 created and starred in the Comedy Central series Jon Benjamin Has a Van.

Benjamin talks to us about and how his career in comedy and voice acting came together, the humble beginnings of the beloved animated series Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist, and the perks inherent in voicing the super-spy and super-jerk Sterling Archer.

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The Outshot: Huell Howser and "California's Gold"

This week, Jesse pays tribute to the documentarian Huell Howser -- a California transplant with a Tennessee drawl and perpetual and infectious sense of wonder.

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Judd Apatow, Dolly Parton, Jason Reece

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Judd Apatow
Guests: 
Dolly Parton
Guests: 
Jason Reece
Guests: 
Alex Zalben
Guests: 
Brian Heater

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to the show in iTunes or via the RSS feed, or check out our SoundCloud page to share any or all of these interviews or recommendations!

December Comics Recommendations: King Cat and Tune: The Vanishing Point

Brian Heater and Alex Zalben join us this week to share some comics picks. Alex suggests you check out Derek Kirk Kim’s Tune: Vanishing Point, a charming, insightful graphic novel with a great twist at the end. Brian recommends the 73rd issue of John Porcellino’s King Cat, a long-running, autobiographical mini-comic featuring tight, minimalist artwork and storytelling.

Brian Heater curates Boing Boing’s comics column, and Alex Zalben writes about comics for MTV Geek.

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Judd Apatow on making movies with his family, staying funny and provoking audiences

Judd Apatow is a man who wears many hats: director, producer, screenwriter, husband, and father to name a few. His new movie, This is 40, explores the struggle many married couples face as they try to keep careers and children sorted while nurturing a strong relationship. Apatow talks about his relationship with his wife and collaborator, Leslie Mann, grappling with insecurity, and the source of his lifelong aversion to being the “bad guy.” He also fills us in on the latest Pee-Wee Herman movie news.

This is 40 opens in theaters December 21st.

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Jason Reece of ...And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead, The Song That Changed My Life

Jason Reece of the band …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead spent many of his teenage years listening to stereotypical punk music from the 80s, and while he loved music, he felt stuck and uninspired by the genre. Fortunately, he stumbled across the Fugazi album 13 Songs in a record store. The song “Waiting Room” changed his perception of what punk music could be.

…And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead’s most recent album is called Lost Songs.

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Dolly Parton on show business and sacrifice

Dolly Parton’s beautiful voice could have easily carried her through life. Parton’s unwavering drive and embrace of hard work meant she was ready and willing to carve her own path, however, despite the great sacrifices such commitment required. Parton joins us this week to discuss some of these sacrifices, how they have affected her life, and how she feels about them now. She also shares stories from her childhood (having grown up in a large family in the mountains of Tennessee, Parton has no shortage of fondly remembered anecdotes) and relates the story behind one of her most well-loved songs, "I Will Always Love You."

Dolly Parton’s new book is called Dream More, and it is available now.

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The Outshot: ego trip's Big Book of Racism

ego trip’s Big Book of Racism takes the beloved coffee table book genre and flips it on its head – it’s a book you might hesitate to display in your living room, just based on its provocative title. The content, however, is a pitch-perfect analysis of the absurdity of racism in modern and historical times – observations any host should be glad to broadcast to his or her guests.

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Singer-Songwriter Bob Mould, of Hüsker Dü and Sugar: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Bob Mould

This week, guest host Dave Holmes is in for Jesse! Dave hosts FX’s DVD on TV, performs at LA’s Upright Citizens Brigade, and you can see him on the web with his series A Drink With Dave.

He speaks to singer-songwriter Bob Mould, who is one of the original members of seminal 1980s punk band Hüsker Dü. After leaving the band, he continued his music career with alternative rock band Sugar and his own solo projects.

His new memoir, See a Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody, goes deep into his past, exploring his personal history, his sexuality, band politics and more.

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DAVE HOLMES: It's The Sound of Young America, I'm Dave Holmes, and my guest this week is Bob Mould. You might know him best as the founder of the 1980s Minneapolis punk band Hüsker Dü . The band only had modest record sales at the time, but they’ve been a huge influence on alternative rock. After the band broke up, Mould went on to release several solo recordings, and in the mid-90s he formed a new group called Sugar. Here's another fun fact: Mould wrote the theme song to The Daily Show, it's called “Dog On Fire.”

He's now written a memoir along with Michael Azerrad, it's called See A Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody. It follows his fascinating career as a gay guy both in and out of the closet in the alternative rock world of the 80s, 90s, and today.

Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome Bob Mould!

BOB MOULD: How ya doing?

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Thanks, The Riverboat Gamblers!

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The great indie record store Amoeba, which was outlets in the Bay Area and here in LA, has a video series called "What's In Your Bag?" Various high-cred bands go shopping at Amoeba and talk about why they picked what they pick.

In the episode above, sent to me by listener Paul, the Texas punk band The Riverboat Gamblers discuss their picks - among them Jimmy Cliff and No Age. One of the guys in the band picked out Killer Mike's debut LP, and much to my surprise, he said his inspiration was hearing Mike on his "favorite show," The Sound of Young America!

Thanks, guy from Riverboat Gamblers! That's nice of you!

(PS: I recommend Mike's two indie LPs, I Pledge Allegiance to the Grind volumes 1 & 2, over his debut, which has some great tracks but is a bit hit-and-miss.)

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