Making Friends with Black People

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Show: 
Bullseye


This week on The Sound of Young America, our theme is Making Friends with Black People.

Our first guest, Nick Adams, is the author of a book by that name, and a standup comedian. His book tackles inter-race relations with a comic edge. We talk about the N-word, being black at liberal arts college, and much more. Nick's about to do a book tour for his book, which will take him to LA & the Bay Area.

Our second guest, Calvin Levels, is a Tony-nominated actor, currently touring the nation with his one-man show James Baldwin: Down From the Mountaintop. Calvin talks with us about Baldwin's life, how he balanced his dual identities as a black American and a gay American, and more. Calvin will be performing in Santa Cruz March 17th as part of UCSC Arts & Lectures.

Download this week's show (MP3 Audio)


Music in this show:
Aretha Franklin's recording of Nina Simone's "To Be Young, Gifted & Black" Buy From Amazon
Science Fiction "Africa" (Unreleased) Buy Science Fiction's Album From Amazon
David Bowie "Young Americans" Buy From Amazon

Comments

Another great show, Jesse - two very interesting guests.

Thanks, Martin. I was glad to get some theater in there this week... I'm sometimes a bit hesitant to do it because it's such a defininitionally local thing, but I just think Baldwin is such a fascinating subject that I decided to go for it.

I am interested in getting the Nick Adams book, because it sounds funny AND informative. But one thing that I wish was addressed in your show (which was great, as always) is the potential uncomfortableness of having a black person see the book on my desk. They might think that it is a self help book, and when I try to politely explain the book they might think that I am applying some of my newly acquired friendliness toward black people skills. This may sound ridiculous to you, but the guy sitting next to me is from Ethiopia, and is a friend, yet I have turned my computer away from his field oI am interested in getting the Nick Adams book, because it sounds funny AND informative. But one thing that I wish was addressed in your show (which was great, as always) is the potential uncomfortableness of having a black person see the book on my desk. They might think that it is a self help book, and when I try to politely explain the book they might think that I am applying some of my newly acquired friendliness toward black people skills. Not very new sincerity I would guess. This may sound ridiculous to you, but the guy sitting next to me is from Ethiopia, and is a friend, yet I have turned my computer away from his field of view. Uncomfortableness. Pathetic.