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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: The Righteous Gemstones' Edi Patterson

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Edi Patterson on her hit show "The Righteous Gemstones"

Actor, comedian Edi Patterson got her start in improv. She's a veteran of the Groundlings sketch group and we can not stress this to you enough: she is super funny.

Edi's past television work includes roles on Californication, Partners and Black-ish. One of her most memorable roles was in Danny McBride's dark comedy Vice Principals where she played a jilted and emotionally unstable past lover of McBride's Neal Gamby.

She currently co stars alongside McBride, John Goodman, Walton Goggins and Adam Devine on HBO's The Righteous Gemstones where she plays the hilarious Judy Gemstone. The show is about the Gemstone family. They're pastors and owners of a massive megachurch with hundreds of thousands of followers. Think Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker. The family centers around Dr. Eli Gemstone, the patriarch, who's been preaching on TV for decades. He's played by John Goodman. But the *show* centers around Eli's kids.Their power struggles, their scheming, their scandals and their hamfisted attempts to curry favor with their father.

On a show filled with some of the most talented people in comedy, Judy Gemstone is easily the funniest character on this show. She's got this kind of manic energy - she alternates between total confidence in everything she does to massive, crippling insecurities. She doesn't have much filter and she has a very, very short temper.

She steals every scene she's in.

Edi talks to Bullseye about reuniting with her Vice Principals costar, about her experience with televangelists and her love of horror films. Edi's a real horror buff!

Plus, we'll talk about "Misbehavin'" the catchy as heck Christian county tune she sings and helped write for the series.

HBO has renewed The Righteous Gemstones for season two. We can't wait to find out what Edi and the rest of the cast and crew have in store!

You can stream Season 1 on HBO.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: John Leguizamo

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John Leguizamo on his special "A Latin History for Morons"

John Leguizamo is a super-famous actor who's been in well over 100 movies and TV shows. You probably know him from his work in films such as Carlito's Way, The Pest, To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar and the Ice Age franchise of movies.

His resume is impressive enough but John's also a writer whose created and starred in a handful of powerful, hilarious one-man shows over his career.

There was his debut production titled, Mambo Mouth, in which he played a total of seven different characters on the stage — compiled and composited from people in his past. They're all deeply personal. Touching and hilarious, too: Leguizamo finds a way to talk about himself and the people in his life - sometimes channel those people - with a remarkably sensitive touch.

John's latest show is called Latin History for Morons. The title kind of explains the show's conceit: with a chalkboard and a professor-y looking suit, Leguizamo gives the audience a history of the Americas that you don't always see in textbooks: stories of oppression, exploitation, disease and war.
But, since it's John Leguizamo… there are dozens of funny voices, recreations of historical figures long-since dead. And it all begins with a story about Leguizamo's life: a few years back, his son was bullied over his latinx heritage at school. Leguizamo wanted to do something about it. Give him something to be proud of.

John talks to Bullseye about that incident in the show - how it happened, how it affected his son, and how it affected him.

Latin History for Morons is streaming now on Netflix.

You can get tickets for the live show here.

Catch John in the flick Playing with Fire in theaters
November 8.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Daveed Diggs

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Daveed Diggs on Hamilton, Blindspotting and Clipping's new record.

Daveed Diggs has one of the most varied resumes in entertainment.

He starred in the original cast of Hamilton – he won a Grammy and a Tony for his roles as Thomas Jefferson and the Marquis de Lafayette.

He's an actor on screen, too. You've seen him on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, The Get Down, Black -ish. Every now and then, he's got a great role in the Elmo's World segment on Sesame Street. His latest can be seen on the Amazon series Undone.

He's also a writer. Diggs co-wrote the screenplay for Blindspotting, a movie about violence and gentrification in Oakland, his hometown. Diggs also co-stars in the film, and it's brilliant.

And, if that wasn't enough he's a very talented musician. He's a member of the rap group Clipping. He serves as the MC, and producer alongside William Hutson and Jonathan Snipes. They create their beats out of weird samples: beer bottles, alarm clocks. They collaborate with noise artists, and Daveed never raps in the first person. Their newest record, There Existed An Addiction to Blood is a study in horror – horror movies, horror soundtracks, and horror rap.

Diggs joins us to talk about Clipping's new record, his various acting roles, and of course, Hamilton. Diggs reflects on his favorite music from his teenage years, and growing up in Oakland. Plus, what it's like to be recognized as a Sesame Street character.

Clipping's new album There Existed an Addiction to Blood is available October 18.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Taylor McFerrin

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Taylor McFerrin on bringing his vocals to the forefront in his new album

Taylor McFerrin is a gifted musician. He got his start as a beatboxer, making beats and producing tracks for others. He's also made music as a keyboardist, a DJ and a composer. As an instrumentalist, McFerrin is brilliant. He creates these lush, kind of swirling songs. He blends jazz, electronic and hip-hop in a way reminiscent of Flying Lotus. In fact, his first album, Early Riser was put out on Flying Lotus' Brainfeeder label.

The son of American jazz vocalist Bobby McFerrin (yes, the "Don't Worry, Be Happy" singer), Taylor grew up with a comprehensive understanding of song construction and an ear for melody. You can hear the influence of his father's use of vocal percussion in Taylor's earlier work as a beatboxer as well as the rich production value that he brings into every track.

Taylor has a new album called Love’s Last Chance. The album represents something of a first for the musician: his first time as lead vocalist on most of the tracks. Each song conjures up the feeling of two past lovers reminiscing about a relationship that once was. The lyrics are timeless but also have a modern feel to them, like scrolling through photos of an ex you've "forgotten" to erase from the Cloud. Taylor's voice is confident and sensual but he also knows when to sit back and let his voice ride the melody.

Taylor joins us to talk about his love of the process of making music, experimenting with 808s and how his new album came together. Plus, we'll talk to him about his work with other artists like Robert Glasper, Thundercat, Emily King and his own father. Don't miss our chat with the talented artist.

Love’s Last Chance is available now.

Catch Taylor on tour across the US
here.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Peter Sarsgaard

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Peter Sarsgaard on his love for soccer and his new film 'The Sound of Silence'

We're joined by Peter Sarsgaard. Peter is an enigmatic actor who has appeared in over 60 different roles in films like An Education, The Magnificent Seven and Green Lantern. He got his start in film back in 1995 when he appeared in Dead Man Walking. From there he has obtained critical acclaim for his roles in films such as Boys Don't Cry as well as Kinsey. In 2004 he was nominated for a Golden Globe for his performance in Shattered Glass as real-life journalist Charles Lane.

Peter's new film is called The Sound of Silence. In it, Peter plays Peter Lucian. He stars opposite Rashida Jones. Peter's a NYC house tuner, meaning he is a sort of scientific guy who goes around studying ambient sound. He lives in New York, one of the loudest, busiest cities in the world. And he's made a business out of creating harmony by finding ways to match the ambient sounds in everyone's apartments. Say you're feeling tired, and down. And the hum of traffic outside your apparent sounds like an A on the piano, why not buy a microwave that cooks in a C Sharp? And a toaster that hums a E?

It's a beautiful, quiet, kind of strange movie. Peter's really captivating in it.

Peter talks to Bullseye about his career, his approach to acting and his love of the game of soccer. No kidding around, here. Peter is really into the sport. Plus, Jesse and Peter dig deeper into the film's study of sound and its impact on human emotion.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Tobacco

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Electronic musician and producer, Tobacco on the early days of Black Moth Super Rainbow, and the latest album Panic Blooms

Tobacco is the nom de guerre of electronic musician and composer Tom Fec. Tom also founded the music collective Black Moth Super Rainbow. If you've seen HBO's Silicon Valley then you've heard some of his stuff – his track Stretch Your Face is featured as the shows theme song.

Tobacco is probably best known as the enigmatic figure behind the musical group Black Moth Super Rainbow. Their music is often categorized as psychedelic rock.

The music is kind of dirty and unsettling. It's made with a ton of old synths, tape distortion. Plus, a lot of weird, processed vocals. It's dark, beautiful and even when you can't quite understand the obscure lyrics there's a lot of feelings there.

Tobacco opens up about the early days of Black Moth Super Rainbow. He'll tell us about some of his first synthesizers, and love of Aphex Twin and Boards of Canada. It's often been noted that members of the band enjoy their privacy, and perform in masks – Tobacco explains the secrecy behind many of the members. Plus, why the latest Black Moth Super Rainbow album Panic Blooms allowed him to open up about depression.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Freddie Gibbs

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Rapper Freddie Gibbs on Bandana, his new album with the legendary producer Madlib.

Before Freddie Gibbs ever dreamed of becoming a rapper, he was working at a shoe store in his hometown of Gary, Indiana. It's a rust belt town, an hour outside of Chicago. It also happens to be the home of Michael Jackson and the Jackson 5.

Gary's a rough place these days. Over the last 6 decades it's hemorrhaged residents, shut down schools, fought a growing crime rate and poverty. Freddie was, like a lot of kids at that time, faced with a future that seemed bleak, searching for an escape. His outlet was in athletics. He was quite good. But like a lot of kids in his neighborhood, he had a hard time staying out of the streets.

Music would become another escape hatch. Gibbs found out a couple of his friends had started making records, they even had a studio in town. So Freddie started hanging out there and pretty soon he wanted to be a part of it even though he wasn't exactly sure what that would look like. Would he become a producer? A DJ? Maybe a manager? Being an MC literally never occurred to him.

It wasn't until Freddie was a grown man that he learned he had a gift for rhyming, a sense of rhythm, and a voice that commands your attention. Freddie raps about the streets. About the time he spent there, about the friends he knows who still are. About the friends he lost. If there's a guiding theme in Gibbs' music - it's pain.

A few years back, his career took an interesting turn: he started collaborating with Madlib, a producer and MC from California. A guy who makes impressionistic, kind of strange beats known more for working with artsier, weirder MC's like MF Doom or Talib Kweli.

The result was Piñata, a record where two very different artists thrive in their own element. It probably shouldn't work, but it does. The music's strange, kind of beautiful. Freddie still raps about the streets. There's still that same pain there. It just hits you harder.

The pair have a new album called Bandana, and it's really great.

Freddie x Madlib BANDANA from Kenny Greene Jr on Vimeo.

Gibbs joins Bullseye and reflects on his upbringing, molding his rhyming style with Madlib's more eclectic beats, making music while on "daddy duty" and why he starts off every live show with a prayer backstage. He also talks to us about a very trying time in his life. Plus, Jesse and Gibbs talk Scarface. The rapper, not the 1980s Al Pacino remake.

Check out Freddie Gibbs on tour throughout Europe this fall.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Joel Kim Booster

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Joel Kim Booster on comedy and acting

Joel Kim Booster is an actor, comedian and writer who has risen in the comedy scene in the last decade. His humor is satirical with a bold confidence that knows when vulnerability is preferred. Joel draws a lot of that vulnerability from his own upbringing. He's Korean-American. He was adopted and raised by a white family in suburban Illinois. His upbringing was conservative and very, very religious.

Growing up home-schooled until the age of 16, Booster would say he lead a pretty sheltered life until young adulthood. It helped, at times, to shield him from some of the more insidious forms of bigotry that could befall a Korean-American gay kid living in a predominately white and abundantly evangelical Christian Midwestern town.

Joel's written for Billy on the Street, Problematic with Moshe Kasher and Netflix's Big Mouth. And as a standup, he's appeared on Conan, Comedy Central's @Midnight and more. These days he's starring alongside Kal Penn in the brand new upcoming NBC sitcom Sunnyside.

Joel talks to Bullseye about his experience growing up in an evangelical household, life lessons through the lens of The Backstreet Boys and how doing stand-up allowed him to find his own lane in comedy. And then challenge it! Plus, he talks about how a changing comedy scene is making room at the table for Asian comics like new Saturday Night Live cast member Bowen Yang.

Put the kids to bed and pick up Joel's album Model Minority here. It's really good.

You can catch him on Sunnyside later this month on NBC.

This interview originally aired in September of 2018.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Dev Hynes of Blood Orange

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Dev Hynes of 'Blood Orange' on his career in music and collaborating with other artists

Dev Hynes is easily one of the most interesting musicians around today. He's worked with Mariah Carey, Carly Rae Jepsen, A$AP Rocky, Kylie Minogue and many others as a producer and/or writer. He's also the man behind Solange's breakout hit Losing You.

Dev's been making music of his own for over ten years now, as well. First under the name Lightspeed Champion and then, starting in 2011 as Blood Orange. His sound is unique. Ethereal. Gritty. Melancholy. Every track seems to reinvent the wheel. Prince, Brian Eno, and Sade provide sonic inspiration. His breakthrough album, 2016's Freetown Sound, made a bunch of year end lists. So did his followup - last year's Negro Swan.

His latest release is a mixtape called Angel's Pulse.

Dev joins Bullseye to talk about his childhood in Essex and finding an escape from school bullying by playing soccer.

He discusses his creative process and how he creates from his imagery and moods. Dev talks to us about learning to shred on guitar to get as good as those talented Heart sisters. Plus, what's it like to wake up to 4 missed calls from Diddy.

Check out Blood Orange on tour this year.

This interview originally aired in October of 2018.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Comedian Matt Braunger on the Craziest Day of his Entire Career

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Craziest Day of My Entire Career: Matt Braunger

The Craziest F**king Day of my Entire Career is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite people about some truly unbelievable stories. This time around, we're joined by the comedian Matt Braunger.

Matt's been working the road as a stand-up for more than a decade. He's got a handful of very funny specials and albums to his name. He has also appeared on shows like Superstore, Take My Wife and Agent Carter.

One of his biggest breaks came in 2008. He got the call to be on David Letterman's Late Show. He'll tell us about the surreal experience of meeting Letterman, and performing on the same stage as legends.

This story has it all: a cameo from Tracy Morgan, a joke about a man named Eggly Bagelface, a special tune by The Pixies, an elevator conversation with Paul Shaffer and it gets even crazier!

You can stream Matt's latest comedy special Finally Live in Portland on Amazon Prime now. He's also on tour this fall with dates all over the country. Check out his website for more information, and follow the latest from him on twitter @Braunger.

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