comedy

Jonathan Coulton is Artist 2.0!

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Our top quality #1 pal Jonathan Coulton has made the newspaper of record -- check out this great piece about him in the New York Times Magazine!

Pilotacular!

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Adult Swim lets loose its brand new pilots today at adultswim.com. They'll also air Sunday in the regular adult swim lineup.

Included:

"Let's Fish," which pairs Brendon Small (Home Movies, Dethklok) with Scott Adsit (30 Rock).

"The Drinky Cow Show," based on the comic strip Maakies by Kasper Hauser pal Tony Millionaire.

& "Fat Guy Stuck in Internet," based on the Channel 102 series Gemberling.

Check them out at adultswim.com and cast your votes.

How many Spidermen?

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Finally, David Letterman answers the age old question: how many Spidermen can fit into a Jamba Juice?

(thanks Kyle!)

Car Talk is Podcasting.

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Yes, it's true, I love Car Talk.

And now, they're podcasting full shows.

Podcast: Coyle & Sharpe Ep. 7: Wolverine Football

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In the early 1960s, James P. Coyle and Mal Sharpe roamed the streets of San Francisco, microphone in hand, roping strangers into bizarre schemes and surreal stunts. Today, their humor is a cultural touchstone for artists as varied as Henry Rollins and The Upright Citizens Brigade.

These recordings are from the Sharpe family archive, which is tended by Mal's daughter, Jennifer Sharpe. You can learn more about Coyle & Sharpe on their website or on MySpace. Their recent box set is These 2 Men Are Imposters.

This week, Coyle & Sharpe invade a football practice field, where the ask a coach for his help training their wolverines in sport.

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"I miss the old Larry."

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I sometimes argue with people who like Curb Your Enthusiasm because Larry Makes them cringe. I love Curb because I identify with Larry 1000%. If that makes me a bad person, then so be it.

In this scene, everything is starting to come up Larry (though he inevitably gets his comeuppance in the end). Jay Johnston makes an appearance as a guy Larry barely knows who asked him to write an important letter of recommendation earlier in the episode, much to Larry's chagrin.

Also, here's a bonus... the one and only Crazy Eyez Killah. Probably the best rap character ever on a white people tv show.

Podcast: Sarah Thyre, author of "Dark at the Roots"

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Bullseye


Sarah Thyre is an actress and writer. She's been seen as Coach Cherri Wolf on "Strangers with Candy," and on The Upright Citizens Brigade and Late Night with Conan O'Brien.

Her memoir, "Dark at the Roots," describes her childhood in the deep south. Rebellious and irreverent, but also secretly deeply class and status conscious, she struggled through catholic school as an outsider.

Please share your thoughts on this program on our forum!

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Our intersititial music is provided by Dan Wally

The Sound of Young America is underwritten in part by Project Breakout

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Podcast: TSOYA Classic: No F***ing Eagles

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We continue our journey into The Sound of Young America's vast audio archive with this program from The Sound of Young America Classics.

Our guests: We talk first with the founders of Lebowskifest, an annual celebration of all things Big Lebowski. Aherents call themselves "Achievers," and flock to the events, typically held in bowling alleys.

We also talk with Seth Greenland. He's the author of the novel "The Bones," which satirizes Hollywood and the world of comedy.

Please share your thoughts on the show in the comments section!

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Podcast: TSOYA Classic: America's Future

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We continue our journey into The Sound of Young America's vast audio archive with this program from The Sound of Young America Classics.

Our guests: Joe Garden is currently features editor of The Onion. He's been a writer there for many years, and is also a candidate to replace Conan O'Brien as the host of Late Night.

Chris Jackson founded the entertainment advocacy and prank group H.O.P.E., or Horrified Observers of Pedantic Entertainment.

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The Comedy of the Schlub

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Sharon Waxman, a former TSOYA guest and a reporter with a great talent for finding the angle, has an interesting piece on the Judd Apatow ouvre in the Times today.

The question she introduces to the debate is an important one, and she quotes Mike White (the man behind such wonderful films as "School of Rock" and "The Good Girl"):

“To me, I definitely stand in the corner of wanting to give voice to the bullied, and not the bully. Here’s where comedy is catharsis for people who are picked on,” he said.

“There’s a strain in ‘Knocked Up’ where you sort of feel like something’s changed a little bit,” he continued. “My sense of it is that because those guys are idiosyncratic-looking, their perception is that they’re still the underdogs. But there is something about the spirit of the thing, that comes under the guise of comedy, where — it’s weird. At some point it starts feeling like comedy of the bullies, rather than the bullied.”

Apatow writes to Waxman:

“I think there is a nerd’s fantasy involved in many of these films. We all wish that somebody would take the time to get to know us, and love us, warts and all.”

He added: “I always wanted to be given a shot. And the sick part is this: No matter how many shots I get, I never completely lose the feeling of inadequacy that makes me wish I would get a chance to prove myself.”

The line between nerd-schlub and bully-schlub is a fine one. I think a great illustration might be the films of Adam Sandler, where while the protagonist is often a weird outsider type, and invariably a man-child, there's little attention paid to the real feelings that are so central to "The 40-Year-Old Virgin." Often in Sandler's films, acting like an emotionally stunted jerk is almost the reason for his triumph.

I haven't yet seen "Knocked Up," and I'm very excited to, but this will give me something to consider between now and then.

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