director

Switchblade Sisters Episode 93: 'Rebecca' with 'The Wind' Director Emma Tammi

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Guests: 
Emma Tammi

Rebecca

This week, the wonderful Katie Walsh returns to chat with director Emma Tammi. Emma is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles, whose most recent documentary films include Election Day and Fair Chair. She made her narrative feature directorial debut with the Western horror movie The Wind, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2018, and was released in April by IFC Midnight.

The movie that Emma has chosen to discuss shares a number of similarities to her own lonely-haunted-woman film - Alfred Hitchcock's sole Best Picture winner, Rebecca. She and Katie discuss all of the masterful aspects of the movie - the mood, the set, the acting, the lighting. Emma shares how many of these attributes inspired her decisions on The Wind. Plus, Katie reveals some hilariously volatile memos between producer David O. Selznick and Alfred Hitchcock. And Emma talks about her all-time favorite Hitchcock films, and what makes him such a genius.

You can stream The Wind now.

And if you haven't seen Rebecca yet, run - DON'T WALK! - to see it.

With Katie Walsh and Emma Tammi.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 92: 'American Psycho' with 'Satanic Panic' Director Chelsea Stardust

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Guests: 
Chelsea Stardust

American Psycho

Chelsea Stardust has been a horror film fan since the age of 10. After working for comedy legends Ivan Reitman and Judd Apatow, Chelsea found her horror home at Blumhouse Productions, where she served as the executive assistant to Jason Blum for several years. Chelsea’s first feature film, the science fiction thriller All That We Destroy, was part of Blumhouse series 'Into The Dark' and is currently available on Hulu. Her second feature film, the horror comedy Satanic Panic, written by novelist Grady Hendrix, and produced by Fangoria and Cinestate, releases nationwide theatrically, on VOD and digital HD on September 6th.

The movie that Chelsea chose to discuss is near and dear to our hearts - Mary Harron's American Psycho. She and April go in deep on the making of the film - from the writing of the script by former Switchblade Sisters guest Guinevere Turner, to the studio's objection to the casting of Christian Bale. They dive into the film's portrayal of male vanity, the performance of Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman, and the difficult job of balancing horror and comedy in one movie. Plus they also discuss Chelsea's latest film Satanic Panic.

You can see Satanic Panic on September 6th.

And if you haven't seen American Psycho yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Chelsea Stardust.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher. Edited by Jordan Kauwling for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 91: 'The Innocents' with 'The Babadook' and 'The Nightingale' Director Jennifer Kent

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Guests: 
Jennifer Kent

The Innocents

Jennifer Kent is probably best known for directing her 2014 film, The Babadook. The film screened at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2014 to critical and audience acclaim, and has won over 50 international and domestic awards, including the Australian Director's Guild award for Best Director, the Australian Academy Award (AACTA) for Best Direction, Best Screenplay and Best Film, and the New York Critics Circle Awards for Best First Feature. This year now sees the release of her second feature, The Nightingale, a brutal colonial revenge tale about a woman who loses everything and joins up with an aboriginal tracker to find and inflict punishment on the men who wronged her.

The movie that Jennifer has chosen to discuss is the 1961 classic, The Innocents. Jennifer elaborates on the aspects of the film that she used as direct influence for her own films. She talks about taking the young actor Noah Wiseman to the zoo in order to prepare him for the truly horrifying scenes in The Babadook. Plus, she divulges how the misconceptions about her film The Nightingale have really hurt her personally. She tells a story about how one journalist at the Venice Film festival even called her a "whore" for directing the film. And finally, if you listen all the way through the episode, you get to hear Jennifer's impeccable impression of a Tasamanian devil.

You can see The Nightingale in select theaters now.

And if you haven't seen The Innocents yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Jennifer Kent.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 89: 'Donnie Darko' with 'Braid' Director Mitzi Peirone

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Guests: 
Mitzi Peirone

Donnie Darko

Mitzi Peirone was born and raised in Turin, Italy. After high school Peirone left Italy to study theater in New York City at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. She ended up writing and directing a short film called “Chaosmos,” and directing another short called “Versperlings” while she geared up for a feature. The screenplay for Braid rapidly became her main focus, and in 2016 Peirone partnered up with entrepreneur Joseph Lubin to create a new business model to finance her film, which became the first one ever to be fully financed through a cryptocurrency equity crowdsale. The sale raised 1.7 million dollars in two weeks. The film premiered at Tribeca in 2018 and won Best Picture at the Lausanne Underground Film Festival. Braid, which tells the story of two women who decide to rob their wealthy psychotic friend - but must participate in the friend’s perverse game of make believe, received worldwide distribution via Blue Fox Entertainment. Mitzi then signed with ICM, and her next directorial effort is a sci-fi thriller set in a tech-apocalypse, starring Bella Thorne.

The movie Mitzi chose to discuss this week is a real mind bender - 2001's cult classic, Donnie Darko. Part of the reason that Mitzi loves this film is that, much like her own movie Braid, it can be hard to tell what is real and what is imagined. She discusses her unusual fundraising technique for the movie which involved a cryptocurrency equity crowdsale. Mitzi also emphasizes the need for filmmakers not to concern themselves with whether the audience will completely understand their vision. Plus, she talks at length about her belief that there is no difference between reality and dreams - a conversation that makes April's brain explode.

You can see Braid streaming now.

And if you haven't seen Donnie Darko yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Mitzi Peirone.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 87: 'Blacula' with 'Jezebel' Director Numa Perrier

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Guests: 
Numa Perrier

Blacula

Born in Haiti and raised in small town USA, Numa Perrier is a Los Angeles-based actor, filmmaker, and artist. Early in her acting career, she landed a recurring role on General Hospital, but now you can see her on SMILF and films including Florida Water, Jerico, In The Morning, and Beautiful Destroyer. An early creator in the digital space, she starred in and was co-writer of the web series 'The Couple' which landed an HBO deal. She later started writing a script for her first feature, which would become Jezebel. That project was accepted into the Tribeca Film Institute "Through Her Lens" incubation program. Now Jezebel is premiering at SXSW 2019. The film follows 19-year-old Tiffany as she deals with her dying mother and tries to make ends meet when her older phone sex operator sister grooms her to become one of the first black webcam girls in the 1990s.

The movie that Numa has chosen to discuss is a classic - 1972's Blacula. She and April go deep on their discussion of William Marshall's intense, Shakespearean portrayal of the eponymous vampire. Plus, they dissect how radical this film was in terms of its portrayal of black men on screen. Numa opens up about the making of her own movie, Jezebel. She gives some great advice on filming and completing a micro-budget film. Plus, she discusses the double standard that low budget black filmmakers face versus their white counterparts.

You can see Jezebel out this fall.

And if you haven't seen Blacula yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Numa Perrier.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: John Waters

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
John Waters

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

John Waters on his legacy in film, Little Richard, his mustache, and more

John Waters is a director who hasn't made a movie in over a decade, and he doesn't really plan to make any more. He's directed some classics like Pink Flamingos, Cry-Baby and probably most notably Hairspray.

Even though he's not making movies anymore, he keeps busy. He's an actor – he played director William Castle in FX's Feud, Pete Peters in Seed of Chucky and he even had a cameo in one of those Alvin and the Chipmunks movies.

He's done a ton of live performances, released a few compilation albums and he's written seven books. When he joined us in studio he talked about his book Make Trouble. The book was based off a commencement speech he gave at the Rhode Island School of Design in 2015.

Jesse talks with him about Little Richard, trigger warnings, and how the film industry tried (and failed) to make the King of Trash compromise his work. Plus, he'll tell us about the fabulous Commes de Garcon shirt he wore to the recording.

His latest is his memoir, Mr. Know-It-All: The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder. It's out now. You can also find the recent Criterion Collection re-release of Multiple Maniacs, one of John's first ever movies on DVD.

Inside Pop Ep. 147 - A Conversation with the director of American Horror Story, Mayans M.C., and Raising Dion

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Show: 
Inside Pop
Guests: 
Rachel Goldberg

This week, we are excited to bring you our conversation with Rachel Goldberg, a successful TV and Film director who has worked on episodes of American Horror Story, Mayans M.C., and the upcoming Netflix series Raising Dion. Rachel discusses how she approaches directing in different genres, the recent shift in Hollywood when it comes to hiring female directors and gives some sage advice on how to be successful in the industry.

We are also in the midst of the Max Fun Drive! Take the time right now to head over to maximumfun.org/donate to become a member, renew or upgrade your membership. We appreciate your support!

Then, in this week's Big Sell, Sean gives his review and rating of a recent album from the soul/funk band with an international vibe, Khruangbin, and sells Amita on new music from Tierra Whack.

You can find more info about Rachel Goldberg here.

Check out Khruangbin's Tiny Desk Concert performance of Maria Tambien here.

Sean's Top 4 female bass players:

4. Melissa Auf der Maur

3. Gail Ann Dorsey

3. Tina Weymouth

1. Meshelle NdegeOcello

Follow us on Twitter & Instagram @PopInsiders

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Academy Award nominated director Debra Granik

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Debra Granik


Photo: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images

Debra Granik on her new film 'Leave No Trace'

Debra Granik, wrote and directed the acclaimed 2010 film "Winter's Bone." The film was sort of a modern film noir, except instead of LA or New York, it was set in the Ozarks. It followed a 17-year-old girl as she pieced together the story behind her father's disappearance. Ree Dolly walked through burned out meth labs, negotiated with crime families, bail bondsmen and cops. And, of course: Ree Dolly was played by Jennifer Lawrence. It was her first ever starring role.

After 8 years, Granik just released her follow up - it's called "Leave No Trace," which is available to stream on Amazon now. Like "Winter's Bone," her new film "Leave No Trace" puts a compelling but compassionate focus on marginalized groups - one of the main threads is a combat veteran's struggle with trauma and homelessness.

It tells the story of a father and daughter who live entirely off the grid in a nature reserve not far from Portland, Oregon. The film details regular life for Will (Ben Foster) and his daughter Tom (Thomasin McKenzie). They forage and cook mushrooms. Will teaches Tom to play chess. They build fires for warmth. The way they live is peaceful, but not exactly legal. They are discovered in the woods by the police and social workers get involved, offering housing, work, school. But as you might imagine, it's a tough transition – especially for Will.

Debra Granik talks about the process of making her new film at length. Debra is also working on a film based on the book "Nickeled and Dimed," which is a thoroughly investigated, brilliant work of nonfiction about the impact of the 1996 welfare reform act on the working poor in the US. She'll tell us how she plans to turn that into a narrative film. Plus, she explain what she learned about film making from being wedding videographer long before she was a film director.

This interview originally aired in July of 2018

Listen to this interview on YouTube!

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Alexander Payne, Kay Cannon, and Eugene Levy

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Alexander Payne
Guests: 
Kay Cannon
Guests: 
Eugene Levy

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images for BF

Filmmaker Alexander Payne on his film 'Downsizing'

Alexander Payne is an accomplished writer and director. He's won two Academy Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay for the films "Sideways" and "The Descendants." His other films have been nominated for tons of awards, too -- "About Schmidt," "Nebraska," and "Election." His films are known for their satirical nature, dark humor and usually include some sort of existential crisis. His latest film "Downsizing" is no exception.

The movie centers on Paul and Audrey, an average couple from Omaha, played by Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig. In an effort to combat overpopulation and global warming, people can be shrunk down to about five inches. But things don't go exactly as planned for the couple.

Jesse sat down with Alexander Payne to talk about his love of silent films, what it was like to achieve success for his thesis film shortly after graduating college, and how he bonds with his six-month-old through film. Plus, he'll tell us about his favorite sequence in "Downsizing," and why he loved directing the challenging eight minute scene.


Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for SXSW

The Craziest Day Of My Entire Career: Kay Cannon

Kay Cannon is a brilliant and hilarious writer. You know her work -- she wrote all three of the Pitch Perfect movies. Before that, she spent five years on "30 Rock," first as a writer and then as a supervising producer. Kay then went on to work on Fox's "New Girl" and she also created the Netflix original series "Girlboss."

Her directorial debut, "Blockers" is in theaters now. In the film, three teen girls make a pact to lose their virginity on prom night. Their parents, played by Leslie Mann, Ike Barinholtz and John Cena, will do everything they can to stop them.

Kay Cannon tells us about the craziest day of her entire career, which starts on the Golden Gate Bridge, takes a scary private plane flight in a private jet and ends in an awkward meeting with John Cena.


Photo: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Eugene Levy on working with his son on 'Schitt's Creek'

Eugene Levy is probably best known for his role as Noah Levenstein in the "American Pie" franchise. Noah is the nerdy, oftentimes clueless dad of Jim Levenstein (Jason Biggs). Noah's efforts to help Jim navigate puberty often result in embarrassing and awkward situations for Jim. The film series spans eight films, and Eugene is the only actor to appear in all of them.

He first got his start in improv comedy. He was a founding member of SCTV - the pioneering sketch comedy show that helped launch the careers of Rick Moranis, John Candy, Catherine O'Hara, and many, many more.

Recently, he's been reunited with Catherine O'Hara in the sitcom "Schitt's Creek." The show was created by Eugene and his son, Dan Levy. Eugene plays Johnny Rose, the patriarch of a socialite family that lost their fortune. Johnny and his wife Moira, played by Catherine, head to the last place they can call their own: the backwoods Canadian town Johnny bought as a gag gift the year before. Together the family pieces their life back together.

Eugene sits down with Jesse and talks about what it was like to work with his son on "Schitt's Creek," and why he almost turned down his iconic role from "American Pie."


Photo: SFMOMA

The Outshot: Rigo 23’s “found lost bird” posters

And finally, Jesse tells us about a recent visit to the Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco. He describes the lost bird posters collected by Rigo 23 in the 1990's from the Mission District in San Francisco. The posters reflect the lives of the people who posted them, but also serves as a reminder of a community that no longer exists.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Beth Ditto and Ernest Dickerson

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Beth Ditto
Guests: 
Ernest Dickerson

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

Beth Ditto on Going Solo

Beth is a singer and songwriter. She was born and raised in Searcy, Arkansas and moved to Washington State out of high school and made a name for herself as the singer in Gossip.
The band first broke through in the early 2000s, coming up with dance punk groups the Rapture, LCD Soundsystem, and Liars. But Gossip was different, they were fun, proudly queer, and female led. Gossip broke up last year, and in the wake of all that, Beth Ditto has released her first ever solo record called Fake Sugar.

In conversation with Jesse, Beth opens up about her childhood, from setting up punk shows in her small Arkansan town to her move to Olympia, Washington after high school. Beth talk about the process of creating her new solo album, and about her time fronting Gossip.

Beth's new album Fake Sugar is available now.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Ernest Dickerson on his 1992 film Juice

Director Ernest Dickerson is best known for his 1992 film Juice which launched the acting careers of people like Omar Epps, Queen Latifah, and Tupac Shakur. But before all of that, he attended New York University for film, where he met classmate Spike Lee. When he graduated, he worked on music videos for Bruce Springstein and Anita Baker, eventually collaborating with Spike Lee on some of Lee's most iconic films. Dickerson has also spent a lot of time working on television such as The Walking Dead, Law & Order, and The Wire.

Dickerson tells Jesse what it is like navigating the film space as an African-American man. They talk about his career working on his personal projects, and his collaborations with Spike Lee.

You can buy Dickerson's Juice which turned 25 this year.

Click here to listen to Ernest Dickerson's interview on YouTube.

The Outshot: Car talk

Jesse tells us why he thinks Car Talk is the best public radio show ever. What do you think? Leave a comment if you like, but you're wrong if you disagree. Just saying!

Click here to listen to and share this hot take on Youtube!

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