Dracula

Switchblade Sisters Episode 87: 'Blacula' with 'Jezebel' Director Numa Perrier

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Numa Perrier

Blacula

Born in Haiti and raised in small town USA, Numa Perrier is a Los Angeles-based actor, filmmaker, and artist. Early in her acting career, she landed a recurring role on General Hospital, but now you can see her on SMILF and films including Florida Water, Jerico, In The Morning, and Beautiful Destroyer. An early creator in the digital space, she starred in and was co-writer of the web series 'The Couple' which landed an HBO deal. She later started writing a script for her first feature, which would become Jezebel. That project was accepted into the Tribeca Film Institute "Through Her Lens" incubation program. Now Jezebel is premiering at SXSW 2019. The film follows 19-year-old Tiffany as she deals with her dying mother and tries to make ends meet when her older phone sex operator sister grooms her to become one of the first black webcam girls in the 1990s.

The movie that Numa has chosen to discuss is a classic - 1972's Blacula. She and April go deep on their discussion of William Marshall's intense, Shakespearean portrayal of the eponymous vampire. Plus, they dissect how radical this film was in terms of its portrayal of black men on screen. Numa opens up about the making of her own movie, Jezebel. She gives some great advice on filming and completing a micro-budget film. Plus, she discusses the double standard that low budget black filmmakers face versus their white counterparts.

You can see Jezebel out this fall.

And if you haven't seen Blacula yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Numa Perrier.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Judge John Hodgman Episode 400: Live From Vancouver 2019

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Louise Burns
Guests: 
Dave Shumka

This week's episode was recorded LIVE IN VANCOUVER! We hear the dispute "LOVE DRACTUALLY" and Swift Justice, with guests Louise Burns and href="https://twitter.com/daveshumka">Dave Shumka!

EVIDENCE

--

Thank you to Andreas Meyer for naming this week's case! To suggest a title for a future episode, like Judge John Hodgman on Facebook. We regularly put out a call for submissions.

--

SUBSCRIBE TO THIS PODCAST in APPLE PODCASTS or the RSS FEED

International Waters Ep. 124: H.P. Lovecraft: Monster Racist

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Alison Becker
Guests: 
Keith Powell
Guests: 
Dan Tetsell
Guests: 
Sophie Duker
Guests: 
Dave Holmes

Alison Becker, Keith Powell, Dan Tetsell and Sophie Duker join host, Dave Holmes, to Discuss monsters, defend (and attack) their home countries and decide what the best way to say certain words is.

Alison wants to plug Bubble and Best Worst Week Ever. She recommends the Amazon Prime Show The Patriot.

Keith wants to plug Bubble and an upcoming episode of Superstore that he directed. He recommends The Great British Baking Show.

Sophie wants to plug her stand up show Diet Woke and recommends the newest Janelle Monáe album Dirty Computer.

Dan wants to plug his wife’s upcoming show at the Edinburgh Film Festival and recommends the Netflix comedy series The Letdown.

And finally, Dave Holmes is on Twitter @DaveHolmes and his book, Party of One is available now in paperback.

You can let us know what you think of International Waters and suggest guests through our Facebook group or on Twitter.
Written by Riley Silverman and John-Luke Roberts, recorded at MaxFunHQ in LA and GuiltFreePost in London, produced by Laura Swisher and Julian Burrell.

Additional "Bleh!" in Pop Culture

| 0 comments

Sometimes, folks go above and beyond what is asked of them. Listener Jamie McCormick, in addition to submitting her theories as to when the first Dracula spoke the first "Bleh!", also generously provided a list of more recent cultural references to that odd vampire parody sound. This was a tremendously kind gesture given that it will (probably) have no impact on whether she wins the coveted prize.

McCormick noted that "Bleh!" was chanted repeatedly by a vampire character in the "Pink Plasma" episode of "The Pink Panther" (episode 78, from 1975); spouted by Count Drakeula in the "Ducky Horror Picture Show" episode of Duck Tales (episode 32 from 1988); and uttered nearly continuously by Count Blah, a friend of Greg the Bunny.

I’ve included all of them here to bring some animated levity to your otherwise-predictably-gory Halloween viewing.


"Blehs!" start around 3:16.



First “bleh!” around 4:17.


Editor's note: Language NSFW, despite featuring a bunny.

On a related cartoon note, Anna Brawley wrote in to say that she thought there was an old Bugs Bunny short with the same plot as “Pink Plasma” that was made in the 1940s; but I think she is referring to “Transylvania 6-5000” which does feature Bugs getting chased by Dracula, but which was actually made in 1963. It isn’t the winner, and it isn’t big on “bleh!”, but you should absolutely watch it anyway. It’s truly a classic.

On the History and Origin of Dracula's Use of the Bizarre Expletive "Bleh!"

| 5 comments



On this week’s episode of Judge John Hodgman, His Honor set a task for devoted listeners. As your Halloween homework, he asked you to research the origin of Dracula’s use of the term “Bleh!”

Since you are a wonderful, loyal and intellectually curious audience, many listeners wrote in promoting a variety of interesting theories. The first, and likely the most commonly held, suggests that the "word" slowly seeped into our lexicon whilst we absorbed countless indistinguishable impressions of legendary Dracula performer Bela Lugosi. Nathaniel Reha promoted this theory, lifting a quote from the Straight Dope boards: “Actually, thinking about it a sec, I’m hearing a hundred-odd bad impersonations of Bela Lugosi in my head, doing the “I vant to suck your blood!” line. Blood, in the bad accent, becomes ‘bluh’ (with a shortened, almost silent, d or t sound at the end of the word), which just becomes the one readily identifiable word when you think of someone’s bad Hungarian/Transylvanian vampire-speak.” Though listener John McGlothlin notes “[I]f your letter-writer-inner was convinced that ‘bluh’ did not originate in strict canon, that would rule out it stemming directly from Lugosi’s accent in the 1930’s Dracula film.”

Which leads to our second theory. Several listeners suggested that the phrase first appeared in a 1952 Bela Lugosi film called "My Son the Vampire". Jamie McCormick wrote: “The earliest occurrence I can find of a Dracula character making the sound is from 'My Son, The Vampire', a 1953 musical satire starring Lugosi in essence mocking the franchise he himself created. Nosferatu, in company with the other early silent Dracula films, makes no reference to the sound, nor does Lugosi make the sound in his early and serious-minded Dracula films. Note especially the last line of the film's title track – “He wants Bluuuuuuuuuuud!”

Jamie also provided links to the film for those who want to verify this theory. You can find the full film on You Tube or on Netflix; but Jamie also astutely notes that only the Netflix version has the song "My Son, the Vampire" rolling over the credits. Why?

I did some further research. Actually, that title song provides a rather interesting clue. As listener John McGlothlin noted, “[A]round . . . 1964, Allan Sherman put out a comedy song titled “My Son, the Vampire” which opens with “blood!” being screamed in a strange way that sounds rather ‘bluh’ like.” This Allan Sherman tune is the title song of the movie in some (but not all) versions of the film. According to IMDB , the film's original title was “Vampire Over London”, (this is the version available on You Tube), but it was apparently retitled "My Son, the Vampire" for its 1963 American re-release (six years after Bela Lugosi's death) to cash in on the success of Allan Sherman's album, "My Son, the Folksinger". Indeed, there is an American trailer for the film that prominently features Mr. Sherman:

I also discovered that Rhino released an EP of Sherman’s work in 2005 that includes “My Son, The Vampire”. So for 99 cents you can nab the song from itunes and consider the audio evidence yourself. (Although, truthfully, you hear him utter the critical word during the few seconds of the song's free preview).

A third theory, promoted by multiple listeners, claims that the sound was first uttered by comedian Gabe Dell. Kevin Harris first advanced this theory without any video or audio evidence; but listener Cayman Unterborn did all of the heavy lifting for him by providing an extensive defense of Dell as the source of the original parody. First, he provided this explanation from Svenghoolie (who he identifies as a venerable Chicago Horror Icon): “. . . Bela, as Dracula, never said ‘Bleh!’ It was indeed an imitator – back in the days of the old Steve Allen TV show; one of his stock players, Gabriel Dell (who had, at one time, been a ‘Dead End Kid’ in movies – and may have even worked with Bela in a cut-rate Monogram movie) was playing Dracula – and did the ‘bleh!’ thing (or, do you spell it ‘blah!’) From there on, it was history. So many Drac and/or Bela impersonators have done that now that most people assume that Bela actually did that . . .” Unterborn also found a CD that appears to feature a 1963 recording of Gabriel Dell doing his Dracula character (not on the Steve Allen show) and he also points out that you can download audio of the relevant Steve Allen Show episodes where Dell performs as Dracula, but it's going to cost. In terms of putting these performances on the correct spot in our "bleh!" timeline, I discovered that, according to IMDB, Dell performed this character on Steve Allen's Plymouth Show in 1957 (episode 2.35) and again in 1959 (episode 5.3). So that puts it after the original release of "Vampire Over London", but before the re-release of that film with the Allan Sherman title song.

Finally, two listeners suggested a connection to comedian Lenny Bruce. John McGlothin (who, along with Adam Pracht, tried to maximize his chances of winning by providing support for three of these theories) notes that “[I]n the 1960s, Lenny Bruce did a parody of Dracula as a Yiddish man, and the Eastern European accent may have made blood sound a bit like “bluh.” But McGlothin did not provide links to any video or audio which verifies Bruce’s performance or its place in this timeline. This theory does, however, have the backing of reference librarian Emily Menchal who states that there is support for the Lenny Bruce theory in David Skal’s book The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror.

That concludes my dutiful summary of the wonderful answers you uncovered.

So who's right? Only one man can judge the true winner of this contest! And we await his verdict.

Syndicate content