horror

Switchblade Sisters Episode 87: 'Blacula' with 'Jezebel' Director Numa Perrier

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Numa Perrier

Blacula

Born in Haiti and raised in small town USA, Numa Perrier is a Los Angeles-based actor, filmmaker, and artist. Early in her acting career, she landed a recurring role on General Hospital, but now you can see her on SMILF and films including Florida Water, Jerico, In The Morning, and Beautiful Destroyer. An early creator in the digital space, she starred in and was co-writer of the web series 'The Couple' which landed an HBO deal. She later started writing a script for her first feature, which would become Jezebel. That project was accepted into the Tribeca Film Institute "Through Her Lens" incubation program. Now Jezebel is premiering at SXSW 2019. The film follows 19-year-old Tiffany as she deals with her dying mother and tries to make ends meet when her older phone sex operator sister grooms her to become one of the first black webcam girls in the 1990s.

The movie that Numa has chosen to discuss is a classic - 1972's Blacula. She and April go deep on their discussion of William Marshall's intense, Shakespearean portrayal of the eponymous vampire. Plus, they dissect how radical this film was in terms of its portrayal of black men on screen. Numa opens up about the making of her own movie, Jezebel. She gives some great advice on filming and completing a micro-budget film. Plus, she discusses the double standard that low budget black filmmakers face versus their white counterparts.

You can see Jezebel out this fall.

And if you haven't seen Blacula yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Numa Perrier.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 86: 'Black Christmas' with 'Night of the Comet' & 'Chopping Mall' Star Kelli Maroney

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Kelli Maroney

Black Christmas

Kelli first got her big break in daytime TV, both as the evil adolescent Kimberly in Ryan's Hope and then as vengeful Tina in One Life to Live. Her film debut as the ‘Spirit Bunny’ Cindy Carr in Fast Times at Ridgemont High caught a lot of attention, but Kelli achieved her greatest enduring cult popularity with her delightful turn as the endearingly spunky Samantha in the science-fiction end-of-the-world Night of the Comet. She’s especially memorable as the sweet, killer-robot slayer Alison Parks in the entertaining romp, cult classic Chopping Mall, and as Jamie, a strong female survivor in The Zero Boys, as well as many other films.

The movie that Kelli has chosen to discuss is especially prescient because our host April Wolfe just happens to be writing the remake of the film. That's right, Kelli has chosen to discuss the 1974 classic, Black Christmas. She and April discuss Kelli's career in horror, and how Kelli takes great joy from the fact that horror has recently received the respect it has always deserved. She also talks about "embracing her crap" and coming to terms with the fact that she is most remembered for her cult and horror films. But she also elaborates on how honored she is by the support she receives from the fans of her work, and how meaningful that relationship is to her. Plus, she has a great story about how an off-the-cuff line she said while shooting a machine gun became one of Night of the Comet's most famous lines.

If you haven't seen any of Kelli's films, Night of the Comet is a great place to start.

And go watch Black Christmas too, while you're at it.

With April Wolfe and Kelli Maroney.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 85: 'Night Tide' with 'Gas Food Lodging' Director Allison Anders

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Allison Anders

Night Tide

Allison Anders is an award-winning screenwriter, film and television director who was born in Kentucky and raised in LA. She attended film school at UCLA, where she co-directed the 1987 feature film Border Radio. Her first solo feature film, starring Fairuza Balk and Ione Skye, Gas Food Lodging premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 1992, and earned her Independent Spirit Award Nominations for Best Director and Best Screenplay. She went on to write and direct the feature films Mi vida loca, Grace of My Heart, and Sugar Town, as well as Things Behind the Sun, for which she won a Peabody award. She’s directed episodes of Sex and the City, Orange Is the New Black, Southland, Riverdale, Murder in the First and recently Sorry for Your Loss.

The movie that Allison has chosen to discuss is a deep cut, but a good one. It's the moody, horror, thriller Night Tide. Allison discusses her early fascination with the film and how it keeps re-emerging in her life. She elaborates on the beginning of her career, and how it really spawned from deeply stalking Wim Wenders. Allison talks at length about the move from independent features to directing television. And she has an amazing story of helping Harry Dean Stanton cultivate his character on Paris, Texas with a poem she wrote after having a catatonic episode.

If you haven't seen any of Allison's films, Gas Food Lodging is a great place to start.

And go watch Night Tide too, while you're at it.

With Katie Walsh and Allison Anders.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 80: 'An American Werewolf in London' with 'American Psycho' and 'Charlie Says' Writer Guinevere Turner

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Guinevere Turner

An American Werewolf in London

Guinevere Turner is a writer, director and actor who has been working in film and TV since her 1994 debut feature Go Fish, which she wrote, produced and starred in. The film premiered at Sundance and then got picked up by Samuel Goldwyn. Next, Guinevere teamed up with director Mary Harron to write the adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis’ novel American Psycho, starring Christian Bale as a psychopathic finance guy who murders people for fun and to see how much he can get away with. Guinevere also worked with Harron writing The Notorious Bettie Page. She was a writer, story editor, and played a recurring character on Showtime’s The L Word. Her latest screenplay, Charlie Says, tells the story of the women who killed for Charles Manson as they serve out the first few years of their decades-long prison term. Charlie Says is directed by Mary Harron and is in theaters now.

The movie that Guinevere has chosen to discuss is An American Werewolf in London. She and April elaborate on just how groundbreaking this film was in terms of its combination of comedy and real horror. They, of course, dissect the famous werewolf transformation scene. Plus, Guinevere talks about her own process, and how her childhood spent in a cult inspired her newest film Charlie Says. She reveals that she hates it when actors change the dialogue from one of her screenplays, but conversely, as an actress she always asks if she can change lines. She discusses her dislike of tricking actors into performances. And she even touches upon working with Christian Bale on American Psycho and her decades long collaborative relationship with Mary Harron.

You can check out Charlie Says in theaters now.

If you haven't seen it yet, go watch An American Werewolf in London.

With April Wolfe and Guinevere Turner.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 79: 'The Red Queen Kills Seven Times' with 'Body at Brighton Rock' Director Roxanne Benjamin

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Roxanne Benjamin

The Red Queen Kills Seven Times

Roxanne Benjamin is a Los Angeles-based filmmaker, who began her career in creative development, analyzing story for film festivals and production companies. In 2010, she moved up the ladder at a company called The Collective, where she went on to produce the well known anthology horror films V/H/S and V/H/S/2, which premiered at Sundance Midnights. Roxanne then helmed the short “Don’t Fall”, part of Magnolia Pictures’ all-women-helmed horror anthology, XX. She served double duty on the film, co-writing and producing the segment “The Birthday Party” for musician-turned-director Annie Clark aka St. Vincent. Body at Brighton Rock is her solo feature directorial debut. It tells the story of a young woman working the trails of a mountainous park, who finds a dead body in the middle of nowhere and is given orders to guard the scene, facing down all her worst fears. Roxanne is currently working on a remake of Night of the Comet for Orion Pictures.

The movie that Roxanne has chosen to discuss is a giallo classic - The Red Queen Kills Seven Times by Emilio Miraglia. She and April go over all the tenants of the Italian giallo genre - the murder, the fashion, the blood! Roxanne talks about how giallo has influenced the way she works on her own films, and particularly, how she crafts her kills on screen. Plus she goes into detail on the production of her newest film, Body at Brighton Rock, and the "1980's TV movie" look she was going for. She and April also dissect the unfortunate prevalence of rape in the horror genre, and how so often it's disturbingly used as a device to titillate.

You can check out Body at Brighton Rock streaming now.

If you haven't seen it yet, go watch The Red Queen Kills Seven Times.

With April Wolfe and Roxanne Benjamin.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 77: 'The Peanut Butter Solution' with 'Pet Sematary' Actor and 'The Girlfriend Experience' Co-creator Amy Seimetz

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Amy Seimetz

The Peanut Butter Solution

Amy Seimetz started out writing, directing, and acting in short films and made her feature debut in a pair of films, Black Dragon Canyon and the indie cult hit Wristcutters: A Love Story. She appeared in films such as Gabi on the Roof in July, Tiny Furniture, You're Next, and The Myth of the American Sleepover before directing her own feature debut, Sun Don't Shine in 2012. Amy went on to co-create and executive produce the critically acclaimed Starz series The Girlfriend Experience. In 2018, Amy directed two episodes of the acclaimed FX series Atlanta and subsequently signed a first look television production development deal with the network. But yes, she continued acting throughout that time as well, and you’ve seen her in Upstream Color, Alien: Covenant, The Killing, Stranger Things, Wild Nights with Emily, and Pet Sematary.

But the movie that Amy chose to discuss has nothing to do with any of that! She's chosen The Peanut Butter Solution, a Canadian children's movie from the eighties that most people thought they dreamed up. April and Amy dissect the crazy plot and how something this unconventional could be made for children. Amy discusses working on her debut Sun Don't Shine, collaborating with Hiro Murai and Donald Glover on Atlanta, and being directed by Madeleine Olnek on Wild Nights with Emily. Plus, they ponder the lessons on creative freedom that can be learned from children's films and how it's sometimes best to not think logically.

You can check out Pet Sematary and Wild Nights with Emily in theaters now.

If you haven't seen it yet, go watch The Peanut Butter Solution.

With April Wolfe and Amy Seimetz.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Who Shot Ya? Episode 85: The Gang Gets Buried in the 'Pet Sematary' and Discusses Why There Are So Many Horror Remakes

| 0 comments
Show: 
Who Shot Ya?

Pet Sematary

Much like being buried behind the 'Pet Sematary,' this podcast will bring you back to life! April, Alonso, and Drea discuss the latest Stephen King movie adaptation. They also try to tackle why there are so many horror remakes recently, and when it actually makes sense to remake a film. Plus, they answer a question from the Who Shotline - "What's your favorite movie with a tragic, yet happy, ending?" And, of course, we've got staff picks.

In news, Keanu Reeves was sent to "movie jail," WGA members begin to fire their agents, and Werner Herzog wants to know all about Pokémon GO.

Staff Picks:

Alonso - Wild Nights with Emily
Drea - Hail Satan?
April - Smithereens

With Alonso Duralde, Drea Clark, and April Wolfe.

You can let us know what you think of Who Shot Ya? on Twitter or Facebook. Or email us at whoshotya@maximumfun.org

Call us on the "Who Shotline" - WSY-803-1664

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 76: 'Alien' with 'Little Woods' Director Nia DaCosta

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Nia DaCosta

Alien

To quote the Tribeca Film Festival, director Nia DaCosta is “a name you’re gonna need to get familiar with.” Nia DaCosta was born and raised in New York City and attended NYU’s Tisch. She started her film career paying her dues in production, on the documentary series, Ke$ha: My Crazy Beautiful Life, while also writing and directing shorts. In 2015, she took an early draft of her script for a film called Little Woods to the Sundance Directors Lab. There, she hooked up with Tessa Thompson, who read the part of a woman named Ollie, who’s caught in a poverty trap in rural North Dakota and must decide whether she’ll re-enter a life of crime to help her pregnant sister. Tessa Thompson continued with the project, and Nia then cast Lily James to play her sister. The film premiered in 2018 at the Tribeca Film Festival. Shortly after that, it was announced that Nia would be directing the “spiritual sequel” to Candyman off a script penned by Jordan Peele and Win Rosenfeld, which will be released by MGM.

The movie Nia has chosen to discuss is 1979's Alien. To quote Nia, "it's a perfect film." She and April discuss the revolutionary character of Ripley, played by Sigourney Weaver, and how the world had never seen someone like her before. Nia talks about working and collaborating with Tessa Thompson on her character in Little Woods. She elaborates on directing the upcoming Candyman and what she learned from Jordan Peele. Plus, Nia tells April how Tessa Thompson is excellent at acting with her hands, or as Nia calls it - "hacting."

You should check out Little Woods in theaters on April 19.

If you haven't seen it yet, go watch Alien.

With April Wolfe and Nia DaCosta.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 75: 'The Bad Seed' with 'Breakthrough' Director and 'Star Trek: Voyager' Actor Roxann Dawson

| 0 comments
Guests: 
Roxann Dawson

The Bad Seed

Roxann got her first job playing Diana Morales in the Broadway production of A Chorus Line. But fans probably know her best for her role as B'Elanna Torres in Star Trek: Voyager. Voyager offered her the first opportunity to direct and she proceeded to direct 10 episodes of the next Star Trek series, Enterprise. Since then, she’s directed The Deuce, House of Cards, The Americans, The Path, Bates Motel, Crossing Jordan, Lost and many others. She will also be directing the upcoming Morning Show, starring Reese Witherspoon, Steve Carrell, and Jennifer Aniston. She makes her feature film directing debut with Breakthrough, starring Chrissy Metz, Josh Lucas, and Topher Grace, an adaptation of Joyce Smith’s memoir, The Impossible: The Miraculous Story of a Mother’s Faith and Her Child’s Resurrection.

The movie that Roxann has chosen to discuss is, kind of, the exact inverse of her own upcoming film - 1956's The Bad Seed. Maintaining such a prolific acting and directing career, Roxann has so much insight into the craft of acting. She discusses how actors often think that by making "small" acting decisions they are being more authentic, when in reality these decisions are just "lazy" and "boring." She also expresses her belief that the characters in a film should not be discussing the philosophical ideas of the movie, but rather, the film should inspire discussion from the audience. And of course, she talks all about her role as the half-human, half-Klingon, B'Elanna Torres, and what that role has meant not just to fans, but to her personally.

You should check out Breakthrough in theaters on April 17.

If you haven't seen it yet, go watch The Bad Seed.

With April Wolfe and Roxann Dawson.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Syndicate content