Office Space

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Was 1999 the Best Movie Year Ever?

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Brian Raftery

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Brian Raftery on his new book 'Best. Movie. Year. Ever. : How 1999 Blew Up The Big Screen'

Author Brian Raftery talks with us about his new book, which makes the case that 1999 was one of the best years in movie history. Office Space. Three Kings. Rushmore. Being John Malkovich. Eyes Wide Shut. Magnolia. The Matrix. The Blair Witch Project. Yep, '99 wasn't just pagers, portable CD players, and Y2K – there was a lot of groundbreaking, influential movies.


Photo: Simon & Schuster

The book is meticulously researched - featuring interviews from pretty much every person who was making movies back then. Brian joins us to talk about a few of these movies, the careers those movies launched, the way studios marketed them, and the impact they've had on film, 20 years later.

You might not be able to rent these movies at your nearest Blockbuster, but you can buy Brian's new book "Best. Movie. Year. Ever. : How 1999 Blew Up The Big Screen" now.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Stephen Root

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Stephen Root

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Stephen Root on HBO's 'Barry,' 'King of the Hill,' 'Newsradio' and more

Character actor Stephen Root joins us to discuss some of his most memorable roles. He's been in over 200 films since he got his start in the late '80s.

Stephen works in a lot of acclaimed films and TV shows. There's "Office Space," where he played the meek, mumbling, stapler-obsessed Milton. Then there's "Newsradio," where he played billionaire Jimmy James, a role he'll talk about at length in this interview. His most recent work can be seen on HBO's "Barry." On the series he plays Fuches, a hitman's screwball boss.

Odds are you've seen his work in "Get Out," "O Brother Where Art Thou," "Star Trek: The Next Generation," or "King of The Hill." Stephen voiced a bunch of parts on "King of the Hill," and it's some of our favorite work of his. He's probably most famously for voicing Bill, Hank Hill's kinda sad neighbor. He'll tell us why this voiceover role was one of his favorite gigs. Plus, he'll tell us how he got the part in HBO's "Barry," and how he helped flesh out his character's role.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Mike Judge & Sharon Horgan

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Mike Judge
Guests: 
Sharon Horgan

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jason Merritt / Getty Images

Mike Judge on Silicon Valley, Beavis & Butt-Head and Office Space & the Challenges of Being a Showrunner

Mike Judge entered the world of animation with little more than a 16mm Bolex film camera, an audio recorder and a stopwatch. In the early nineties, his animated shorts were extremely popular as part of touring animation shows including Spike and Mike’s Sick and Twisted Animation Festival. These shorts served as the birthplace for some of his most memorable characters, including the iconic Beavis and Butt-Head.

Beavis and Butt-Head were awkward and naive teenage boys, whose vocabulary seemed limited to a series of snickers and grunts. However, the show became a cultural touchstone as well as a lightning rod of criticism for conservative social critics.

The show led to more opportunities for Judge both in film and television. They included the hit animated series, King of the Hill and forays into films with the cult classics Office Space and Idiocracy. His latest show, Silicon Valley is in its third season on HBO.

Mike Judge joined Jesse to talk about the parallels between Hollywood and Silicon Valley, his early years in animation and how the character of Homer Simpson helped him maintain the integrity of his own animated patriarch, Hank Hill.

Silicon Valley airs Sunday nights at 10pm on HBO.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Catastrophe's Sharon Horgan on Creating Flawed Characters and Writing Your Own Sex Scenes

Sharon Horgan has a knack for the creating shows that reveal her characters as determined, funny, sexy, complex and at times, very flustered. Her comedy is more than a series of jokes (though there are plenty of them), and includes insightful observations into what it means to be a professional woman trying to negotiate her other roles of lover, wife and mother. In other words, a real person. You can see that in full display on her latest show, Catastrophe which streams on Amazon Prime.

Though she may be relatively new to American audiences, she has proven herself a talented actress, writer and producer and enjoyed success with her previous show, Pulling which she co-wrote and starred in. Though it ran only for two seasons on British television, it was nominated for several television and comedy awards and established her as a modern comedic voice.

Sharon Horgan sat down with Jesse to talk about getting past the awkwardness of writing (and then having to film) sex scenes with her co-star, the challenge of showing the evolution of a relationship before and after having kids and why she likes playing a character who can sometimes come off as a jerk.

Catastrophe is in its second season and can be streamed on Amazon Prime.


Photo: Andrew H. Walker / Getty Images

The Outshot: Prince

Jesse remembers how the musician Prince inspired people to dare to be themselves.

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