Switchblade Sisters

Switchblade Sisters Episode 93: 'Rebecca' with 'The Wind' Director Emma Tammi

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Guests: 
Emma Tammi

Rebecca

This week, the wonderful Katie Walsh returns to chat with director Emma Tammi. Emma is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles, whose most recent documentary films include Election Day and Fair Chair. She made her narrative feature directorial debut with the Western horror movie The Wind, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2018, and was released in April by IFC Midnight.

The movie that Emma has chosen to discuss shares a number of similarities to her own lonely-haunted-woman film - Alfred Hitchcock's sole Best Picture winner, Rebecca. She and Katie discuss all of the masterful aspects of the movie - the mood, the set, the acting, the lighting. Emma shares how many of these attributes inspired her decisions on The Wind. Plus, Katie reveals some hilariously volatile memos between producer David O. Selznick and Alfred Hitchcock. And Emma talks about her all-time favorite Hitchcock films, and what makes him such a genius.

You can stream The Wind now.

And if you haven't seen Rebecca yet, run - DON'T WALK! - to see it.

With Katie Walsh and Emma Tammi.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 92: 'American Psycho' with 'Satanic Panic' Director Chelsea Stardust

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Guests: 
Chelsea Stardust

American Psycho

Chelsea Stardust has been a horror film fan since the age of 10. After working for comedy legends Ivan Reitman and Judd Apatow, Chelsea found her horror home at Blumhouse Productions, where she served as the executive assistant to Jason Blum for several years. Chelsea’s first feature film, the science fiction thriller All That We Destroy, was part of Blumhouse series 'Into The Dark' and is currently available on Hulu. Her second feature film, the horror comedy Satanic Panic, written by novelist Grady Hendrix, and produced by Fangoria and Cinestate, releases nationwide theatrically, on VOD and digital HD on September 6th.

The movie that Chelsea chose to discuss is near and dear to our hearts - Mary Harron's American Psycho. She and April go in deep on the making of the film - from the writing of the script by former Switchblade Sisters guest Guinevere Turner, to the studio's objection to the casting of Christian Bale. They dive into the film's portrayal of male vanity, the performance of Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman, and the difficult job of balancing horror and comedy in one movie. Plus they also discuss Chelsea's latest film Satanic Panic.

You can see Satanic Panic on September 6th.

And if you haven't seen American Psycho yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Chelsea Stardust.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher. Edited by Jordan Kauwling for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 91: 'The Innocents' with 'The Babadook' and 'The Nightingale' Director Jennifer Kent

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Guests: 
Jennifer Kent

The Innocents

Jennifer Kent is probably best known for directing her 2014 film, The Babadook. The film screened at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2014 to critical and audience acclaim, and has won over 50 international and domestic awards, including the Australian Director's Guild award for Best Director, the Australian Academy Award (AACTA) for Best Direction, Best Screenplay and Best Film, and the New York Critics Circle Awards for Best First Feature. This year now sees the release of her second feature, The Nightingale, a brutal colonial revenge tale about a woman who loses everything and joins up with an aboriginal tracker to find and inflict punishment on the men who wronged her.

The movie that Jennifer has chosen to discuss is the 1961 classic, The Innocents. Jennifer elaborates on the aspects of the film that she used as direct influence for her own films. She talks about taking the young actor Noah Wiseman to the zoo in order to prepare him for the truly horrifying scenes in The Babadook. Plus, she divulges how the misconceptions about her film The Nightingale have really hurt her personally. She tells a story about how one journalist at the Venice Film festival even called her a "whore" for directing the film. And finally, if you listen all the way through the episode, you get to hear Jennifer's impeccable impression of a Tasamanian devil.

You can see The Nightingale in select theaters now.

And if you haven't seen The Innocents yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Jennifer Kent.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 90: 'Little Shop of Horrors' with 'The Last Time You Had Fun' Director Mo Perkins

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Guests: 
Mo Perkins

Little Shop of Horrors

Mo Perkins earned an MFA in directing from UCLA’s School of Film and Television. Her master’s thesis film, Piss Hat, was nominated for a student Academy Award. Her writer/directorial debut feature was an independent film called A Quiet Little Marriage starring Mary Elizabeth Ellis, Cy Carter, Jimmi Simpson, Michael O’Neill, Charlie Day and Melanie Lynskey. On the festival circuit, it won many awards including the Grand Jury Prize at Slamdance, and it was distributed by IFC. Her second feature film was a comedy called The Last Time You Had Fun starring Demetri Martin, Eliza Coupe, Mary Elizabeth Ellis, Charlene Yi and Kyle Bornheimer. The film premiered at the Los Angeles Film Festival and was distributed by Gravitas Ventures. Most recently Mo directed the second season, six episodes, of a romantic musical comedy called I Ship It for the CW.

The movie that Mo has chosen is just a delight - 1986's Little Shop of Horrors. Mo discusses how this movie meant so much to her personally, as it was one of the first films she saw after leaving her commune. April and she talk about the two different endings of the film and how the original was roundly rejected by preview audiences. Mo also elaborates on being flexible during shoots, working on low budget films, and facing the scenes that she was scared to direct.

You can see I Ship It on the CW.

And if you haven't seen Little Shop of Horrors yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Mo Perkins.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 89: 'Donnie Darko' with 'Braid' Director Mitzi Peirone

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Guests: 
Mitzi Peirone

Donnie Darko

Mitzi Peirone was born and raised in Turin, Italy. After high school Peirone left Italy to study theater in New York City at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. She ended up writing and directing a short film called “Chaosmos,” and directing another short called “Versperlings” while she geared up for a feature. The screenplay for Braid rapidly became her main focus, and in 2016 Peirone partnered up with entrepreneur Joseph Lubin to create a new business model to finance her film, which became the first one ever to be fully financed through a cryptocurrency equity crowdsale. The sale raised 1.7 million dollars in two weeks. The film premiered at Tribeca in 2018 and won Best Picture at the Lausanne Underground Film Festival. Braid, which tells the story of two women who decide to rob their wealthy psychotic friend - but must participate in the friend’s perverse game of make believe, received worldwide distribution via Blue Fox Entertainment. Mitzi then signed with ICM, and her next directorial effort is a sci-fi thriller set in a tech-apocalypse, starring Bella Thorne.

The movie Mitzi chose to discuss this week is a real mind bender - 2001's cult classic, Donnie Darko. Part of the reason that Mitzi loves this film is that, much like her own movie Braid, it can be hard to tell what is real and what is imagined. She discusses her unusual fundraising technique for the movie which involved a cryptocurrency equity crowdsale. Mitzi also emphasizes the need for filmmakers not to concern themselves with whether the audience will completely understand their vision. Plus, she talks at length about her belief that there is no difference between reality and dreams - a conversation that makes April's brain explode.

You can see Braid streaming now.

And if you haven't seen Donnie Darko yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Mitzi Peirone.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 88: 'Drop Dead Gorgeous' with 'Grown-ish' Writers Melanie Kirschbaum & Alexandra Decas

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Guests: 
Melanie Kirschbaum
Guests: 
Alexandra Decas

Drop Dead Gorgeous

Melanie Kirschbaum started her LA career working for Jeff and Jackie Filgo, and then Vali Chandrasekaran on Modern Family, while Alexandra Decas was with Jonathan Groff on Black-ish. The two met when their bosses were working on a pilot together, and they decided to join forces when they found themselves standing outside of their offices at Disney, bemoaning their crappy Tinder matches. They wondered, presumably aloud, "If Elizabeth Smart has it all figured out — a husband, a career, great hair — what’s our excuse?" So they wrote a one-act play entitled "Smart" to get to the bottom of it, as well as a comedic one-act about 9/11 called "Center of the Universe." After that, they joined the Netflix/Dreamworks show The Boss Baby: Back in Business as staff writers, but then hit some network gold when they were staffed on the critically acclaimed hit show Grown-ish, a spinoff of Black-ish that follows Zoey Johnson as she navigates college life. Grown-ish was just renewed for season 3 and can be seen on Freeform.

The movie that Alex and Mel have chosen to discuss is an important film for Minnesotans everywhere - 1999's Drop Dead Gorgeous. The two of them and April marvel at the fact that this movie is so inappropriate by today's standards - but still so funny! The two writers open up about how their writing process used to be incredibly unorthodox. One of them is outed as a frequent "office cryer." And, of course, the conversation covers something April is very passionate about - the eyebrow styles of the 1990s.

You can see Grown-ish on Freeform.

And if you haven't seen Drop Dead Gorgeous yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe, Melanie Kirschbaum and Alexandra Decas.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 87: 'Blacula' with 'Jezebel' Director Numa Perrier

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Guests: 
Numa Perrier

Blacula

Born in Haiti and raised in small town USA, Numa Perrier is a Los Angeles-based actor, filmmaker, and artist. Early in her acting career, she landed a recurring role on General Hospital, but now you can see her on SMILF and films including Florida Water, Jerico, In The Morning, and Beautiful Destroyer. An early creator in the digital space, she starred in and was co-writer of the web series 'The Couple' which landed an HBO deal. She later started writing a script for her first feature, which would become Jezebel. That project was accepted into the Tribeca Film Institute "Through Her Lens" incubation program. Now Jezebel is premiering at SXSW 2019. The film follows 19-year-old Tiffany as she deals with her dying mother and tries to make ends meet when her older phone sex operator sister grooms her to become one of the first black webcam girls in the 1990s.

The movie that Numa has chosen to discuss is a classic - 1972's Blacula. She and April go deep on their discussion of William Marshall's intense, Shakespearean portrayal of the eponymous vampire. Plus, they dissect how radical this film was in terms of its portrayal of black men on screen. Numa opens up about the making of her own movie, Jezebel. She gives some great advice on filming and completing a micro-budget film. Plus, she discusses the double standard that low budget black filmmakers face versus their white counterparts.

You can see Jezebel out this fall.

And if you haven't seen Blacula yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Numa Perrier.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 86: 'Black Christmas' with 'Night of the Comet' & 'Chopping Mall' Star Kelli Maroney

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Guests: 
Kelli Maroney

Black Christmas

Kelli first got her big break in daytime TV, both as the evil adolescent Kimberly in Ryan's Hope and then as vengeful Tina in One Life to Live. Her film debut as the ‘Spirit Bunny’ Cindy Carr in Fast Times at Ridgemont High caught a lot of attention, but Kelli achieved her greatest enduring cult popularity with her delightful turn as the endearingly spunky Samantha in the science-fiction end-of-the-world Night of the Comet. She’s especially memorable as the sweet, killer-robot slayer Alison Parks in the entertaining romp, cult classic Chopping Mall, and as Jamie, a strong female survivor in The Zero Boys, as well as many other films.

The movie that Kelli has chosen to discuss is especially prescient because our host April Wolfe just happens to be writing the remake of the film. That's right, Kelli has chosen to discuss the 1974 classic, Black Christmas. She and April discuss Kelli's career in horror, and how Kelli takes great joy from the fact that horror has recently received the respect it has always deserved. She also talks about "embracing her crap" and coming to terms with the fact that she is most remembered for her cult and horror films. But she also elaborates on how honored she is by the support she receives from the fans of her work, and how meaningful that relationship is to her. Plus, she has a great story about how an off-the-cuff line she said while shooting a machine gun became one of Night of the Comet's most famous lines.

If you haven't seen any of Kelli's films, Night of the Comet is a great place to start.

And go watch Black Christmas too, while you're at it.

With April Wolfe and Kelli Maroney.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 85: 'Night Tide' with 'Gas Food Lodging' Director Allison Anders

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Guests: 
Allison Anders

Night Tide

Allison Anders is an award-winning screenwriter, film and television director who was born in Kentucky and raised in LA. She attended film school at UCLA, where she co-directed the 1987 feature film Border Radio. Her first solo feature film, starring Fairuza Balk and Ione Skye, Gas Food Lodging premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 1992, and earned her Independent Spirit Award Nominations for Best Director and Best Screenplay. She went on to write and direct the feature films Mi vida loca, Grace of My Heart, and Sugar Town, as well as Things Behind the Sun, for which she won a Peabody award. She’s directed episodes of Sex and the City, Orange Is the New Black, Southland, Riverdale, Murder in the First and recently Sorry for Your Loss.

The movie that Allison has chosen to discuss is a deep cut, but a good one. It's the moody, horror, thriller Night Tide. Allison discusses her early fascination with the film and how it keeps re-emerging in her life. She elaborates on the beginning of her career, and how it really spawned from deeply stalking Wim Wenders. Allison talks at length about the move from independent features to directing television. And she has an amazing story of helping Harry Dean Stanton cultivate his character on Paris, Texas with a poem she wrote after having a catatonic episode.

If you haven't seen any of Allison's films, Gas Food Lodging is a great place to start.

And go watch Night Tide too, while you're at it.

With Katie Walsh and Allison Anders.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Sisters Episode 84: ‘3 Days of the Condor’ with the Incomparable Adrienne Barbeau

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Guests: 
Katie Walsh
Guests: 
Adrienne Barbeau

3 Days of the Condor

Adrienne Barbeau was born in Sacramento, California, and caught the showbiz bug while entertaining troops on Army bases in Southeast Asia as part of the San Jose Civic Light Opera. She moved to New York City in the 1960s and made her Broadway debut co-starring in Fiddler on the Roof with Bette Midler. She went on to star in more than 25 musicals and plays, originating the role of Rizzo in the Broadway production of Grease, for which she was nominated for a Tony. From 1972 to 1978, Adrienne starred in the sitcom Maude as Carol, the daughter of Bea Arthur’s character. She was nominated for a Golden Globe for that role. She also made appearances in numerous TV shows, movies of the week and game shows. In 1980 Adrienne starred in her first theatrical film, John Carpenter’s The Fog, as radio deejay Stevie Wayne. That film established her as a genre film star. She went on to star in sci fi and horror classics such as Escape from New York, Wes Craven’s Swamp Thing, and the Steven King adaptation Creep Show. She’s also starred in comedies like Canonball Run and Back to School and Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle of Death. She’s never stopped working and we’re thrilled to have her on the show with guest host Katie Walsh.

Adrienne chose to talk about 3 Days of the Condor, based on the 1974 novel Six Days of the Condor by James Grady. Sidney Pollack directed the 1975 film, which was written by Lorenzo Semple Jr. and David Rayfiel.

If you haven't seen it yet, go watch 3 Days of the Condor. For those of you with library cards, you can stream it for free on Kanopy.

With Katie Walsh and Adrienne Barbeau.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

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