Sorry to Bother You

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Steven Yeun and Sawbones' Justin and Dr. Sydnee McElroy

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Steven Yeun
Guests: 
Justin McElroy
Guests: 
Dr. Sydnee McElroy

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Steven Yeun on his new film 'Burning'

First up: Actor Steven Yeun joins us to talk about what he's been up to since his breakthrough performance in the "The Walking Dead" the series.

For seven seasons, Steven played Glenn Rhee on "The Walking Dead." In this post-apocalyptic world where zombies roam the world Glenn's character was always quick to think strategically on his feet. Despite being kind of a loner in the series Glenn was an excellent leader in times of stress. He became one of the series' most beloved characters, and if we're being frank – he was quite a badass. He'll discuss what it was like when he first got that gig and what it was like to deal with people immersed in "Walking Dead" fandom.

Steven's work can also be seen in critically acclaimed films like "Sorry To Bother You" and "Okja." His new movie, "Burning," is the first Korean language film he's performed in. It's South Korea's submission for the Academy Awards. He'll explain why it was so intimidating performing in Korean.

As a kid Steven was pretty active at his local Korean American church. He was born in Seoul, South Korea and grew up in Detroit, Michigan. He says he wasn't the coolest kid on the block but that didn't stop him from trying to assimilate. Something he says he's kind of embarrassed about now. He reflects on his childhood, and explains why trying to fit in was one of the most difficult acting gigs of his life.

Listen to this interview on YouTube!


Photo: Weldon Owen

The couple behind the podcast Sawbones on their new book about misguided medicine

There's something kind of fascinating and morbid about medical history, something unique to that genre. If you look into the history of medicine, one thing will become very clear, very quickly: for the longest time, we had no idea how our own bodies work. Sawbones is a podcast that airs on right here Maximum Fun. It's a show about all the gruesome, gross and sometimes very funny stuff we did to our bodies in the name of health and medicine.

It's hosted by Dr. Sydnee McElroy, a physician and medical history buff, and her husband Justin McElroy. And now: Sawbones is a book, too! It's called "The Sawbones Book: The Hilarious, Horrifying Road to Modern Medicine." It's beautifully illustrated by Teylor Smirl. It's available for purchase now.

Heads up: this is a conversation about medical history, so we'll be talking about blood, guts, injuries and other potentially squeamish stuff. If you're sensitive to that, we thought we'd let you know.

Listen to this interview on YouTube!

Photo: Syracuse University

The Outshot: Remembering Hank Greenwald

Jesse explains why Hank Greenwald, a play-by-play radio announcer for the San Francisco Giants, is his broadcasting hero.

Listen to this segment on YouTube!

Finding Your Scene And Making It Happen (Deep Dive into the Lesbian Bar Scene, Making It Star: Amber Kemp- Gerstel)

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mk
Show: 
Minority Korner
Guests: 
Amber Kemp-Gerstel

In a response to last week's Ask Minority Korner Any thing filled episode, James takes us into a deep dive into what is currently going on with the Lesbian bar scene and the future ahead. Nnekay scored a great interview with Amber Kemp- Gerstel a contestant on the new NBC competition show- Making It. The two talk crafts and how to make it big with your passions. But before we get to the korners, the wonder twins discuss the new movie Sorry To Bother You, Westworld, Luke Cage, and ScarJo and her movie role choices.

Links!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JePugX1YkG4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEtwBNiw8go
https://intomore.com/culture/Where-Did-All-The-Lesbians-Go-Reframing-The...

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-the-gayest-metropolitan-areas-in-a...

http://www.slate.com/blogs/outward/2016/12/20/why_do_lesbian_spaces_have...

https://www.advocate.com/commentary/2017/12/01/what-happened-lesbia

https://damasklove.com/

https://www.nbc.com/making-it?nbc=1

Minority Korner Store: https://teespring.com/minority-korner-t-shirt#pid=369&cid=6513&sid=front

Twitter: @minoritykorner
Email: minoritykorner@gmail.com
Like Us On Facebook: Minority Korner

Pop Rocket Ep. 183: "Sorry to Bother You" w/ Kevin Avery

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Margaret Wappler and Kevin Avery
Show: 
Pop Rocket
Guests: 
Guy Branum
Guests: 
Margaret Wappler
Guests: 
Kevin Avery

***Warning - this episode contains major spoilers***

This week, Guy Branum and Margaret Wappler are joined by Bay Area comedian and two-time Emmy winning writer Kevin Avery. He was head writer on Totally Biased w/ Kamau Bell, staff writer on Last Week Tonight w/ John Oliver and writer on The Jim Jeffries Show. The gang is deep diving into Boots Riley's new movie Sorry to Bother You. Guy, Kevin and Margaret discover that, like Sorry to Bother You's Cassius Green, they all worked as telemarketers. Plus Guy reveals the film's best actor and Kevin tells us about the time he asked Boots for help on a short film.

All Abouts
Margaret is all about Bhad Bhabie- a troubled Florida teen turned rapper based off of a performance on Dr. Phil where she was a guest with her mom. There's this really smart analysis of the Bhad Bhabie phenomenon in the NY Times by Jamie Lauren Keiles who breaks down what she means for the entertainment industry.

Kevin is all about not being about Drake's latest song and the dance challenge it spawned that's sweeping the nation: In My Feelings. The challenge even got Will Smith dancing on a bridge.

Guy is all about the hard-working, talented, and badass Korean-Canadian actress Sandra Oh, who has had to work twice as hard to get half as far in entertainment. She's finally getting her due as the first woman of Asian descent to be nominated for an Emmy in the category of lead actress for Killing Eve.

With Guy Branum, Margaret Wappler, and Kevin Avery.

That's My Jam:

Margaret - The Coup - 5 Million Ways to Kill a C.E.O.

Kevin- Justin Timberlake - Higher Higher.

Guy - Years & Years - All For You.

You can let us know what you think of Pop Rocket and suggest topics in our Facebook group or via @PopRocket on Twitter.

If you haven't already, follow us on Instagram.

Produced by Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org. Edited by Shana Daloria.

Who Shot Ya? Episode 45: Top 5 Directorial Debuts, Oakland, and 'Sorry to Bother You'

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Show: 
Who Shot Ya?
Guests: 
Ricky Carmona
Guests: 
Alonso Durald
Guests: 
April Wolfe

Sorry to Bother You

We're going guest-less this episode as the 'Who Shot Ya?' trio hold down the fort on their own. This week we're covering the movie of the summer, Sorry to Bother You. In the discussion of the film the crew covers the rise of Oakland in cinema, Boots Riley's unique vision, and the powerful political message of the film. Alonso makes a case for a double feature with Sorry to Bother You and The First Purge. Plus, the crew puts together the ultimate Top Five list of directorial debuts. And as always, staff picks.

In news, Thanos apparently killed half of the animals, the cast and crew walk off the 'Roe v. Wade' film, and James Gunn says a good movie can't be ruined by spoilers.

TOP FIVE DIRECTORIAL DEBUTS (In no particular order):
1). Orson Welles - Citizen Kane
2). Kasi Lemmons - Eve's Bayou
3). Spike Lee - She's Gotta Have It
4). Joan Micklin Silver - Hester Street
5). Rose Troche - Go Fish

Weekly Movie Recommendations:

Ricky - Nights of Cabiria
April - Eighth Grade
Alonso - Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation

PLUS, we have two Spotify playlists. One is for Movie Soundtracks and the other is for Movie Scores. Check 'em out!

Next week we're discussing Skyscraper with Morgan Rhodes and Drea Clark

With Alonso Duralde, April Wolfe, and Ricky Carmona.

You can let us know what you think of Who Shot Ya? at @WhoShotYaPod on Twitter. Or email us at whoshotya@maximumfun.org
Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Switchblade Sisters Episode 36: Birth with Kate Berlant

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Guests: 
April Wolfe
Guests: 
Kate Berlant

Birth

We are joined by the wonderful comedian, writer, and actor Kate Berlant. She's on the show to talk about the underappreciated Jonathan Glazer film, Birth. April and Kate dive right into this truly unique movie about a woman who's dead husband may have come back as a 10 year old boy. They make the case for this being Nicole Kidman's best performance as the role is so perfectly catered to her. They discuss the inspired vision of Jonathan Glazer and how he was the only one who could make this film. The two talk about Kate's role in Sorry to Bother You and her short film series 555. Kate elaborates on what goes into writing comedy and the kinds of white people she makes fun of. Plus, she explains why she feels compelled to make silly faces as a form of protest.

You can watch 555 on Vimeo now.

Check out Kate in Sorry to Bother You

And if you haven't seen it yet, go watch Birth

With April Wolfe with Kate Berlant,

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters at @SwitchbladePod on Twitter. Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org
Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Boots Riley

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Boots Riley

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

Boots Riley on the Transition from Music to Film and the Role of Art in Revolution

Boots Riley is the frontman and founder of the legendary hip-hop collective The Coup. The group produced simple music - the beats never had a lot of frills. When he rapped, Boots spoke plainly about stories from his real life. But it was in a really compelling, passionate way. He talked about social justice, poverty, racism and the stuff people do just to get by. A lot of hip-hop is about prosperity - overcoming a system that's been rigged against you for centuries. The Coup, however, wanted to throw the system out entirely.

Boots was born Raymond Lawrence Riley. He grew up in Oakland, California. His parents were political, working actively in the NAACP and the Progressive Labor Party and Boots wanted to carry on that tradition in art.

He went to film school at first, but eventually found his calling in hip-hop. Along with his friend E-Roc, he founded the hip-hop band The Coup in 1991.

About six years ago, Boots started working on a movie - something he'd never really done before. He started telling his friends about it, asking acquaintances in the industry for advice - sometimes he'd just corner a producer for 15 minutes. Thanks to a combination of audacity, determination, and luck, the finished product is hitting theaters next month.

The movie is called "Sorry to Bother You." It's set in Oakland, in kind of an alternate reality. Lakeith Stanfield stars in it. He plays Cassius Green, a black man who gets a gig doing telemarketing. It's in that job he finds the key to success: do a dead-on impression of a white dude and magically, people listen when you call. From there, it gets weirder. There's elements of science fiction, horror, and more and it's out in theaters July 6.

Boots tells Jesse about the recent passing of former Coup member and DJ Pam the Funkstress, The Coup's origin story, and why he doesn't think art alone can start a revolution.

Click here to listen to Boots Riley's interview on YouTube.


Photo Courtesy of Legacy/Columbia/ Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

Outshot: M'Boom

Jazz drummer Max Roach founded the percussion ensemble "M'Boom" in 1970. He wanted to explore the possibilities of percussion, but it was also a socio-political statement.

Roach saw the drum set as the quintessential American instrument, borrowing hand drums from Africa and the native people of North America, snares and bass drums from Europe, and cymbals from the middle east.

M'Boom embraced an international spirit - and particularly the African diaspora spirit. As an African American, Roach was aware of the way his people had been disconnected from their historical-cultural context by slavery. M'Boom was an act of reconnection.

Click here to listen to Jesse's Outshot on M'Boom on YouTube.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Roman Mars and Boots Riley, Live at SF Sketchfest

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Roman Mars
Guests: 
Boots Riley
Guests: 
Steve Agee
Guests: 
Peter Hartlaub

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to the show in iTunes or via the RSS feed, or check out our SoundCloud page to share any or all of these interviews or recommendations!

This week, a live recording of Bullseye, held at the Punchline Comedy Club as part of SF Sketchfest.


From 1978's Invasion of the Body Snatchers

Peter Hartlaub Recommends San Francisco on Film: "The Conversation" and "Invasion of the Body Snatchers"

The San Francisco Chronicle's pop culture critic, Peter Hartlaub, joins us to share some of his favorite San Francisco films.

He recommends Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation for its realistic depiction of San Francisco, as well as the 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, which, in spite of its terrifying story, might give San Francisco's public transit planners some food for thought.

Peter Hartlaub writes for the San Francisco Chronicle and blogs about pop culture at The Big Event.

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Roman Mars on 99% Invisible, Public Media and Crowd-Funding

You'd think that it'd be almost impossible to tell stories about architecture and design in a completely invisible medium, but Roman Mars makes it work. The public radio host and producer's stories show that design is everywhere – he's produced stories about the unintentional music of escalators, failed prison designs, and reclusive monks who make the best beer in the world.

These stories are all a part of 99% Invisible, "a tiny radio show about design" that Roman hosts and produces. The show is truly tiny; it airs for only five minutes on a handful of public radio stations, including KALW. But the podcast is another story. Episodes of the podcast version of 99% Invisible are longer and more detailed – and they reach a much larger audience. Last year, Roman led a massive Kickstarter campaign to fund the show's third season. Fans gave more than $170,000, making it the most successful journalism Kickstarter to date.

Roman joins Jesse onstage to discuss his theory of creativity, his reasons for exchanging his dream of becoming a scientist for a career in public radio, and his Doogie Houser-esque college experience.

99% Invisible is available on iTunes and Soundcloud. You can follow Roman on Twitter at @RomanMars.

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Comedy: Steve Agee on Movie Trivia in the Pre-Internet Age

Why did God invent the internet? Steve Agee has an idea. It's probably not what you think.

Steve Agee is a writer, actor, and standup comedian. He's a former writer for Jimmy Kimmel Live! and appeared as Steve Myron on the beloved Sarah Silverman Program.

You can follow him on Twitter at @SteveAgee.

Embed or Share Comedy: Steve Agee on Movie Trivia in the Pre-Internet Age

The Coup's Boots Riley on Merging Music with Social Activism, and What to Learn From Telemarketing

Boots Riley's life has always been about change, and never about complacency. He was already an leftist activist in high school, staging walkouts on school grounds, and he followed his parents' lead into community organizing. He was immersed in rap and hip hop in his hometown of Oakland, California, but didn't make the connection between the power of music and activism for several years.

Boots has fronted the hip hop group The Coup for over two decades as an MC and producer, and the group's positive, funky, and danceable music is still clearly message-driven in 2013. Their lyrics confront injustice, police brutality, and the rise of corporatism with aggressive wit. The group released a new album, Sorry to Bother You, late last year.

Boots talked to us about why he thinks an active engagement with world makes life worth living, finding humor in the disturbing reality of poverty and injustice, and what he learned from his time in, of all things, telemarketing.

BONUS AUDIO: Boots and his longtime collaborator Eric McFadden performed several songs live on stage. You can listen and share those tracks here.

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The Outshot: "I Got Five On it" by The Luniz

What says "Bay Area" to you? For Jesse, it's all about I Got 5 On It by the Luniz – specifically, the Bay Ballers remix.

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