Willem Dafoe

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Robert Eggers, director of The Lighhouse

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Robert Eggers

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Photo:Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Director Robert Eggers on his new film "The Lighthouse"

Robert Eggers is a filmmaker who's made a name for himself making beautiful horror films that linger with you. Long after you've left the theater.

The writer, director was born in New England and cut his teeth in New York designing and directing theater productions. He made his feature film debut with 2015's The Witch which
premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival to near universal acclaim. Set in 17th century New England, a family of settlers are haunted by an evil force that threatens to destroy them. The film received critical praise.

His latest film, The Lighthouse, is just as haunting.

It's about two old-timey sailor men living on an island off of New England in the 1800s. One is old. The other is young. It's all in black and white. The wind howls outside. The old man, played by Willem Dafoe, doesn't like the young one. He's played by Robert Pattinson. They drink a lot. Somewhere, off the shore, there's a mermaid. A storm comes. The two men, slowly, lose their sanity. We don't want to give too much of it away. You really have to see if for yourself!

The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and has since received rave reviews. Robert talks to Bullseye about the joys of research down to the finest historical detail, about the uniqueness of the New England landscape and provoking questions in his films. Plus, we find out what scares him the most.

The Lighthouse is in theaters now.

Click here to listen to Robert Eggers' interview on YouTube!

Switchblade Sisters Episode 92: 'American Psycho' with 'Satanic Panic' Director Chelsea Stardust

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Guests: 
Chelsea Stardust

American Psycho

Chelsea Stardust has been a horror film fan since the age of 10. After working for comedy legends Ivan Reitman and Judd Apatow, Chelsea found her horror home at Blumhouse Productions, where she served as the executive assistant to Jason Blum for several years. Chelsea’s first feature film, the science fiction thriller All That We Destroy, was part of Blumhouse series 'Into The Dark' and is currently available on Hulu. Her second feature film, the horror comedy Satanic Panic, written by novelist Grady Hendrix, and produced by Fangoria and Cinestate, releases nationwide theatrically, on VOD and digital HD on September 6th.

The movie that Chelsea chose to discuss is near and dear to our hearts - Mary Harron's American Psycho. She and April go in deep on the making of the film - from the writing of the script by former Switchblade Sisters guest Guinevere Turner, to the studio's objection to the casting of Christian Bale. They dive into the film's portrayal of male vanity, the performance of Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman, and the difficult job of balancing horror and comedy in one movie. Plus they also discuss Chelsea's latest film Satanic Panic.

You can see Satanic Panic on September 6th.

And if you haven't seen American Psycho yet, go watch it!

With April Wolfe and Chelsea Stardust.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher. Edited by Jordan Kauwling for MaximumFun.org.

Bullseye: Willem Dafoe, Paul Schrader & David Crosby

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Willem Dafoe
Guests: 
Paul Schrader
Guests: 
David Crosby

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Paul Schrader - Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer /Getty Images


Willem Dafoe - Photo: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images

Paul Schrader and Willem Dafoe talk their new film Dog Eat Dog, Schrader’s childhood, and Dafoe’s acting ethos

Growing up in the Calvinist church, Paul Schrader didn't see a movie until his late teens. Since then, he has more than made up for it, writing, producing, and directing influential films such as Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, and Affliction.
Willem Dafoe, having worked on 7 films in the past with Schrader, trusts his film-making style and sensibility. Dafoe's Hollywood breakout role was in the 1985 film To Live and Die in L.A., and has starred in many other beloved films such as Platoon and the Last Temptation of Christ.
This week, Schader and Dafoe sit down with Jesse to discuss their new film, Dog Eat Dog. They discuss Schrader’s childhood, his earlier screenplay and directorial premieres and Dafoe school’s Jessie on acting and how he gets into character when portraying psychotic characters.


Photo: Jason Merrit/Getty Images

David Crosby on The Byrds, CSN, his recovery from drugs, and his new album Lighthouse

Thirty years ago, David Crosby was one of the biggest rock stars in the world, being a part of two game changing and Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inducted bands Crosby, Stills & Nash and The Byrds. Decades after his depart from playing with bands, he continues to play music on his own.
In conversation with Jesse, David discusses his transition into music, his addiction and recovery from drugs, and his latest album Lighthouse.

The Outshot: Ray Baretto’s Acid

This week, Jesse recommends Ray Barretto’s inaugural album Acid as an album that had much ambition and achieved so much at a time when the music on it was still new to the American aural palette.

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